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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Strakes Effects on Asymmetric Flow Over a Blunt-Nosed Slender Body at a High Angle of Attack

[+] Author and Article Information
Qihang Yuan, Zhongyang Qi

Ministry-of-Education,
Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China

Yankui Wang

Professor
Ministry-of-Education,
Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: wangyankui@buaa.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received July 3, 2018; final manuscript received October 21, 2018; published online December 10, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Hui Hu.

J. Fluids Eng 141(6), 061103 (Dec 10, 2018) (12 pages) Paper No: FE-18-1454; doi: 10.1115/1.4041815 History: Received July 03, 2018; Revised October 21, 2018

In general speaking, the missiles execute flight at high angles of attack in order to enhance their maneuverability. However, the inevitable side-force, which is caused by the asymmetric flow over these kinds of traditional slender body configurations with blunt nose at a high attack angle, induces the yawing or rolling deviation and the missiles will lose their predicted trajectory consequently. This study examines and diminishes the side-force induced by the inevitable asymmetric flow around this traditional slender body configuration with blunt nose at a high angle of attack (AoA = 50 deg). On one hand, the flow over a fixed blunt-nosed slender body model with strakes mounted at an axial position of x/D = 1.6–2.7 is investigated experimentally at α = 50 deg (D is the diameter of the model). On the other hand, the wingspan of the strakes is varied to investigate its effect on the leeward flow over the model. The Reynolds number is set at ReD = 1.54 × 105 based on D and incoming upstream velocity. The results verify that the formation of asymmetric vortices is hindered by the existence of strakes, and the strake-induced vortices develop symmetrically and contribute to the reduction in side-force of the model. In addition, the increase in strake wingspan reduces asymmetric characteristics of the vortex around the model and causes a significant decrease in side-force in each section measured. The strake with the 0.1D wingspan can reduce the sectional side-force to 25% of that in the condition without strakes.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of experimental layout: (a) top view of the layout and (b) photograph of the mode and apparatus

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Fig. 2

Schematics illustrating the model, together with symbol designations: (a) side view of the blunt-nosed slender body without strakes (base model), (b) side view of the blunt-nosed slender body with strakes (strake-mounted model), and (c) rear view of the tap section with definition of APP's location)

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Fig. 3

Variations of Cy with x/D (V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, β = 0 deg, λ = 0, and θp = 270 deg)

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Fig. 4

Asymmetric flow in zone A-B (V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, β = 0 deg, λ = 0, and θp = 270 deg): (a) variations of Cp with the section circumferential angle θ. ((b)–(d)) Distributions of time-averaged dimensionless vorticity and streamlines for sections in rear view, (b) x/D = 1.4, (c) x/D = 2.2, and (d) x/D = 2.6.

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Fig. 5

Asymmetric flow in zone B-C (V = 23m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, β = 0 deg, λ = 0, and θp = 270 deg): (a) variations of Cp with the section circumferential angle θ and (b) distributions of time-averaged dimensionless vorticity and streamlines for section x/D = 3.0 in rear view

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Fig. 6

Asymmetric flow in zone C-D (V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, β = 0 deg, λ = 0, and θp = 270 deg): (a) variations of Cp with the section circumferential angle θ, ((b) and (c)) distributions of time-averaged dimensionless vorticity and streamlines for sections in rear view, (b) x/D = 4.0, and (c) x/D = 5.0

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Fig. 7

Variations of Cy with x/D (V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, and β = 0 deg)

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Fig. 8

Distributions of time-averaged dimensionless vorticity and streamlines (rear view, V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, β = 0 deg, x/D = 1.8, and θp = 270 deg): (a) λ = 0 and (b) λ = 0.05

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Fig. 9

Asymmetric flow at x/D = 2.2 (V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, β = 0 deg, and θp = 270 deg): (a) variations of Cp with the section circumferential angle θ (curve breaks as taps being covered by strakes), ((b) and (c)) distributions of time-averaged dimensionless vorticity and streamlines in rear view, (b) λ = 0, and (c) λ = 0.05

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Fig. 10

Asymmetric flow at x/D = 3.0 (V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, α = 50 deg, β = 0 deg, and θp = 270 deg): (a) variations of Cp with the section circumferential angle θ, ((b) and (c)) distributions of time-averaged dimensionless vorticity and streamlines in rear view, (b) λ = 0, and (c) λ = 0.05

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Fig. 11

Variations of Cy with λ for sections (α = 50 deg, V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, β = 0 deg, and θp = 270 deg)

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Fig. 12

Asymmetric flow with variant λ conditions (α = 50 deg, V = 23 m/s, ReD = 1.54 × 105, β = 0 deg, θp = 270 deg, and x/D = 2.2): (a) variations of Cp with the section circumferential angle θ (curve breaks as taps being covered by strakes), ((b)–(e)) distributions of time-averaged dimensionless vorticity and streamlines in rear view, (b) λ = 0.1, (c) λ = 0.15, (d) λ = 0.2, and (e) λ = 0.25

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