0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Fully Developed Flow in Curved Channels of Square Cross Sections Inclined

[+] Author and Article Information
Tay-Yueh Duh, Yaw-Dong Shih

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tatung Institute of Technology, Taipai, Taiwan

J. Fluids Eng 111(2), 172-177 (Jun 01, 1989) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3243619 History: Received April 22, 1988; Online October 26, 2009

Abstract

The fully developed viscous flow in curved channels of obliquely oriented square cross section with angle of inclination is analyzed for an incompressible fluid. A nonorthogonal helical coordinate system is introduced to study the flow field for various angles of inclination. To obtain a stationary numerical solution, a primitive-variable formulation of the pressure-velocity finite-difference scheme is formulated based on an ADI method. The results for the channel at zero angle are compared with data available in the literature. Detailed predictions of secondary-flow streamlines, axial velocities and friction factor ratios show that there are significant changes at inclination angles 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 deg. At a certain Dean number, it is found that no additional pair of vortices appears near the outer wall, except for angle of inclination 0 deg. If the Dean number is less than 125 the friction factor ratio has a minimum value at zero angle. If the Dean number is greater than 125, the minimum value of the friction factor ratio occurs at the angles of rotation 15 and 75 deg.

Copyright © 1989 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In