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RESEARCH PAPERS

Unstable Flow in Centrifugal Fans

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Chen

School of Mechanical & Production Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 2263

M. Soundra-Nayagam

Department of Electrical & Electronics Engineering, Loughborough University of Technology, Loughborough, U.K

A. N. Bolton

Flow Center, National Engineering Laboratory, Glasgow, U.K

H. C. Simpson

Department of Mechanical & Processing Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, U.K

J. Fluids Eng 118(1), 128-133 (Mar 01, 1996) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2817490 History: Received October 06, 1994; Revised February 17, 1995; Online December 04, 2007

Abstract

Rotating stall and the inlet vortex in centrifugal fans with inlet vane control has been studied. The advances in stall research in aero-engine compressors are discussed. The present study shows that stall in centrifugal fans can be quite different from that in axial compressors, in that stall can occur in a progressive and intermittent fashion. The study also shows that a discontinuity in the fan characteristic is not necessarily accompanied by rotating stall, unlike the axial machines. Experimental results indicate that the positive prewhirl created by inlet vanes tends to delay the occurrence of stall. Also, dorsal fin devices that are used to control the inlet vortex do not seem to affect the stall point unfavorably. The inlet vortex frequency was found to invariably exhibit a linear relation with the flow rate even when dorsal fins were used. This offers a practical method to distinguish between the inlet vortex and rotating stall.

Copyright © 1996 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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