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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A BEM for the Prediction of Unsteady Midchord Face and/or Back Propeller Cavitation

[+] Author and Article Information
Yin L. Young, Spyros A. Kinnas

Ocean Engineering Group, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712

J. Fluids Eng 123(2), 311-319 (Jan 31, 2001) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1363611 History: Received November 03, 1999; Revised January 31, 2001
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
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References

Fine, N. E., 1992, “Nonlinear analysis of cavitating propellers in nonuniform flow,” Doctoral dissertation, Department of Ocean Engineering, MIT.
Kinnas, S., and Fine, N., 1992, “A nonlinear boundary element method for the analysis of unsteady propeller sheet cavitation,” Proceedings, Nineteenth Symposium on Naval Hydrodynamics, Aug., pp. 717–737.
Kinnas,  S., and Fine,  N., 1993, “A numerical nonlinear analysis of the flow around two- and three-dimensional partially cavitating hydrofoils,” J. Fluid Mech., 254, Sept., pp. 151–181.
Mueller, A., and Kinnas, S., 1997, “Cavitation predictions using a panel method,” Proceedings, ASME Symposium on Marine Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Vol. 14. Nov. 16–21, pp. 127–137.
Mueller, A., 1998, “Development of face and mid-chord cavitation models for the prediction of unsteady cavitation on a propeller,” Masters thesis, UT Austin, Dept. of Civil Engineering, May.
Mueller,  A., and Kinnas,  S., 1999, “Propeller sheet cavitation predictions using a panel method,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 121, June, pp. 282–288.
Kosal,  E., 1999, “Improvements and enhancements in the numerical analysis and design of cavitating propeller blades,” Masters thesis, UT Austin, Dept. of Civil Engineering. May; Also, UT Ocean Eng. Report 99–1.
Lee,  H., and Kinnas,  S., 2001, “MPUF-3A (version 1.2) user’s manual and documentation,” Technical Report No. 01–2, Ocean Engineering Group, UT Austin, Jan.
Kinnas,  S., 1991, “Leading-edge corrections to the linear theory of partially cavitating hydrofoils,” J. Ship Res., 35, No. 1, Mar., pp. 15–27.
Kinnas, S., 1992, “Leading edge correction to the linear theory of cavitating hydrofoils and propellers,” Proceedings, Second International Symposium on Propeller and Cavitation. Sept.
Kinnas,  S., 1992, “A general theory for the coupling between thickness and loading for wings and propellers,” J. Ship Res., 36, No. 1, Mar., pp. 59–68.
Kinnas, S., Choi, J., Lee, H., and Young, J., 2000, “Numerical cavitation tunnel,” Proceedings, NCT50, International Conference on Propeller Cavitation, Apr. 3–5.
Choi, J., 2000, “Vortical inflow—propeller interaction using unsteady three-dimensional euler solver,” Doctoral dissertation, Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Aug.
Kinnas,  S., and Hsin,  C.-Y., 1992, “A boundary element method for the analysis of the unsteady flow around extreme propeller geometries,” AIAA J., 30, No. 3, Mar., pp. 688–696.
Morino,  L., and Kuo,  C.-C., 1974, “Subsonic Potential Aerodynamic for Complex Configurations: A General Theory,” AIAA J., 12, No. 2, Feb., pp. 191–197.
Young,  Y., Lee,  H., and Kinnas,  S., 2001, “PROPCAV (version 1.2) user’s manual and documentation,” Technical Report No. 01–4, Ocean Engineering Group, UT Austin. Jan.
Fine, N., and Kinnas, S., 1993, “The nonlinear prediction of unsteady sheet cavitation for propellers of extreme geometry,” Proceedings: Sixth International Conference on Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics, Aug., pp. 531–544.
Fine,  N., and Kinnas,  S., 1993, “A boundary element method for the analysis of the flow around 3-d cavitating hydrofoils,” J. Ship Res., 37, Sept., 213–224.
Mishima,  S., Kinnas,  S., and Egnor,  D., 1995, “The CAvitating PRopeller EXperiment (CAPREX), Phases I & II,” Technical Report, Department of Ocean Engineering, MIT, Aug.
Jessup, S., 1990, “Measurement of multiple blade rate unsteady propeller forces,” Technical Report, DTRC-90/015, David Taylor Research Center, May.
Matsuda,  N., Kurobe,  Y., Ukon,  Y., and Kudo,  T., 1994, “Experimental investigation into the performance of supercavitating propellers,” Papers of Ship Res. Inst., 31, pp. 5.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Cavity shape and pressures for propeller MW1. Mid-chord cavitation. The propeller is based on a design by Michigan Wheel Corporation, USA. Js=1.224,σn=0.8116,Fr=26.6, 60×20 panels. Uniform inflow.
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Validation of simultaneous face and back cavitation on an asymmetric rectangular hydrofoil. 50×10 panels. α=±0.3 deg. fo/C=±0.018(NACA0.8),to/C=0.05(RAE),σv=0.15.
Grahic Jump Location
Validation of simultaneous face and back cavitation on an asymmetric rectangular hydrofoil. 50×10 panels. α=±0.5 deg. fo/C=±0.018(NACA0.8),to/C=0.05(NACA66),σv=0.08.
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Predicted 3-D cavity shape for propeller MW1. The propeller is based on a design by Michigan Wheel Corporation, USA. 60×20 panels. Js=1.224,σn=0.8116, Fr=25.6. Uniform inflow.
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Propeller subjected to a general inflow wake. The propeller fixed (x,y,z) and ship fixed (xs,ys,zs) coordinate systems are shown.
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Convergence of cavitating blade force coefficients with panel discretization for propeller DTMB4148. Δθ=6 deg, σn=2.576,Js=0.954,Fr=9.159.
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Geometry of propeller DTMB5168. Also shown are the predicted and measured KT and KQ for different advance coefficients. PROPCAV v1.2: 80×40 Panels. MPUF-3A v1.2: 20×18 panels.
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Geometry and inflow wake of propeller DTMB4119. Also shown are the predicted and measured KT and KQ for different blade harmonics. PROPCAV v1.2: 80×50 Panels. MPUF-3A v1.2: 40×24 panels.
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Comparison OF PROPCAV’s prediction (top) to experimental observations (bottom) for propeller DTMB4148. Js=0.954,σn=2.576,Fr=9.159, 70×25 panels, Δθ=6 deg.
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Comparison of the predicted and versus measured KT,KQ, and η for different advance coefficients. Propeller SRI. σv=0.4, σnv×Js2.
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Geometry, cavitation pattern, and cavitating pressures for propeller SRI at Js=1.3,σv=0.4,σnv×Js2.
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Top: definition of the exact surface; Bottom: definition of the approximated cavity surface.
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Definition of the cavity height on the blade and on the supercavitating wake
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Geometry and inflow wake of propeller DTMB4148
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Convergence of cavity volume with number of propeller revolutions for propeller DTMB4148. 60×20 panels. Δθ=6 deg, σn=2.576,Js=0.954,Fr=9.159.
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Convergence of cavity volume with blade angle increments for propeller DTMB4148. 60×20 panels. σn=2.576,Js=0.954,Fr=9.159.
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Convergence of cavitating blade force coefficients with blade angle increments for propeller DTMB4148. 60×20 panels. σn=2.576,Js=0.954,Fr=9.159.
Grahic Jump Location
Convergence of cavity volume with panel discretization for propeller DTMB4148. Δθ=6 deg, σn=2.576,Js=0.954,Fr=9.159.
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The convergence of predicted cavities (expanded view) and forces with respect to number of panels for propeller MW1. The propeller is based on a design by Michigan Wheel Corporation, USA. Js=1.224.σn=0.8116, Fr=25.6. Uniform inflow.

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