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Research Papers: Multiphase Flows

Application of the Euler–Lagrange Method to Model Developed Hydrodynamic Slugs in Conduits

[+] Author and Article Information
J. E. V. Guzmán

Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales,  Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacan 04510, México D.F.eguzman@iim.unam.mx

R. Zenit

Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales,  Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacan 04510, México D.F.zenit@.unam.mx

J. Fluids Eng 133(4), 041301 (May 03, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003763 History: Received September 29, 2010; Revised March 02, 2011; Published May 03, 2011; Online May 03, 2011

Hydrodynamic slugging occurs frequently in nature and in various industrial systems. Under certain circumstances, a mechanistic approach to study such flows is possible and the Euler–Lagrange method may be conveniently implemented. Here, the modeling procedure is illustrated with a simple application to a conduit of a general topographic shape. As an example, the model is adapted to simulate the transient pressure response of an oil-industry-like pipeline configuration. The results are validated with experimental data for short, medium, and long slugs. The model constitutes an extension of previous modeling efforts, and illustrates why the usual flow prediction techniques (based on flow-maps) need to be reinterpreted when long slugs are present in such systems.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical arrangement of the phases in a hydrodynamic slug flow regime

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Figure 2

Shape of the transport system and its representation in terms of simplified segments

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Figure 3

External forces acting on an geometrically idealized slug body

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Figure 4

Particular configuration of a flow system and its corresponding operating cycle

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Figure 5

Particular configuration of a flow system and its corresponding operating cycle

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Figure 6

Taitel and Dukler’s flow pattern map for horizontal pipes (circular cross section; see Ref. [4])

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Figure 7

Predicted and measured pressures corresponding to experiments No. 1 (a) and No. 2 (b)

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Figure 8

Predicted and measured pressures corresponding to experiments No. 3 (a) and No. 4 (b)

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Figure 9

Comparison of experimental power spectral densities (PSD) between short and long slugs

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Figure 10

Comparison between predicted and experimental power spectral densities (PSD) for short (a) and long slugs (b)

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Figure 11

Flow pattern map for co-current vertical flows in pipes of circular cross section (taken from Ref. [3])

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