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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Effects of Bulk Flow Pulsations on Phase-Averaged and Time-Averaged Film-Cooled Boundary Layer Flow Structure

[+] Author and Article Information
I.-S. Jung, J. S. Lee

Turbo and Power Machinery Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea

P. M. Ligrani

Convective Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 50 S. Central Campus Drive, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112

J. Fluids Eng 123(3), 559-566 (Mar 05, 2001) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1383972 History: Received August 31, 2000; Revised March 05, 2001
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
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References

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Nix, A. C., Reid, T., Peabody, H., Ng, W. F., Diller, T. E., and Schetz, J. A., 1997, “Effects of Shock Wave Passing on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer in a Transonic Cascade,” AIAA Paper No. AIAA-97-0160.
Popp, O., Smith, D. E., Bubb, J. V., Grabowski, H. C. III, Diller, T. E., Schetz, J. A., and Ng, W. F., 1999, “Steady and Unsteady Heat Transfer in a Transonic Film Cooled Turbine Cascade,” International Gas Turbine & Aeroengine Congress & Exposition, Paper No. 99-GT-259, Indianapolis.
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Popp, O., Smith, D. E., Bubb, J. V., Grabowski, H. C. III, Diller, T. E., Schetz, J. A., and Ng, W. F., 2000, “Investigation of Heat Transfer in a Film Cooled Transonic Turbine Cascade, Part II: Unsteady Heat Transfer,” International Gas Turbine & Aeroengine Congress & Exposition, Paper No. 2000-GT-203, Munich.
Dunn, M. G., Haldeman, C. W., Abhari, R. S., and McMillan, M. L., 2000, “Influence of Vane/Blade Spacing on the Heat Flux for a Transonic Turbine,” International Gas Turbine & Aeroengine Congress & Exposition, Paper No. 2000-GT-206, Munich.
Bergholz, R. F., Dunn, M. G., and Steuber, G. D., 2000, “Rotor/Stator Heat Transfer Measurements and CFD Predictions for Short-Duration Turbine Rig Tests,” International Gas Turbine & Aeroengine Congress & Exposition, Paper No. 2000-GT-208, Munich.
Ligrani,  P. M., Gong,  R., Cuthrell,  J. M., and Lee,  J. S., 1996, “Bulk Flow Pulsations and Film Cooling: Part 1, Injectant Behavior,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transf., 39, pp. 2271–2282.
Ligrani,  P. M., Gong,  R., Cuthrell,  J. M., and Lee,  J. S., 1996, “Bulk Flow Pulsations and Film Cooling: Part 2, Flow Structure and Film Effectiveness,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transf., 39, pp. 2283–2292.
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Seo,  H. J., Lee,  J. S., and Ligrani,  P. M., 1998, “The Effect of Injection Hole Length on Film Cooling With Bulk Flow Pulsations,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transf., 41, No. 22, pp. 3515–3528.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Schematic drawings of (a) test section and coordinate system and (b) injection hole geometry and coordinate system
Grahic Jump Location
Typical timewise variations of: (a) freestream velocity, (b) injectant velocity, and (c) injectant to freestream velocity ratio, as the injectant velocity waveform is phase-shifted relative to the freestream velocity waveform. Phase 0: 0 degrees or 0 π phase shift. Phase 1: 90 degrees or π/2 phase shift. Phase 2: 180 degrees or π phase shift.
Grahic Jump Location
Phase-averaged streamwise velocity profiles at x/d=5 and z/d=0 for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and f=2 Hz
Grahic Jump Location
Phase-averaged streamwise velocity profiles at x/d=5 and z/d=0 for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and f=16 Hz
Grahic Jump Location
Phase-averaged streamwise velocity profiles at x/d=5 and z/d=0 for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and f=32 Hz
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged streamwise velocity profiles at x/d=5,m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. (a) z/d=0, (b) z/d=0.5, (c) z/d=1.0, (d) z/d=1.5.
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged normal component velocity profiles at x/d=5 and z/d=0, for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. Symbols defined in Fig. 6.
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged spanwise component velocity profiles at x/d=5 and z/d=0, for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. Symbols defined in Fig. 6.
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged, normalized profiles of the longitudinal Reynolds normal stress at x/d=5,m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. (a) z/d=0, (b) z/d=0.5, (c) z/d=1.0, (d) z/d=1.5.
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged, normalized profiles of the normal component of Reynolds normal stress at x/d=5 and z/d=0, for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. Symbols defined in Fig. 9.
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged, normalized profiles of the spanwise component of Reynolds normal stress at x/d=5 and z/d=0, for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. Symbols defined in Fig. 9.
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged, normalized profiles of the Reynolds shear stress uv at x/d=5 and z/d=0, for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. Symbols defined in Fig. 9.
Grahic Jump Location
Time-averaged, normalized profiles of the Reynolds three-dimensional shear stress uw at x/d=5 and z/d=0, for m=0.5,l/d=1.6, and bulk flow pulsation frequencies f of 0 Hz, 2 Hz, 16 Hz, and 32 Hz. Symbols defined in Fig. 9.

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