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TECHNICAL PAPERS

The Effects of Compression and Pore Size Variations on the Liquid Flow Characteristics in Metal Foams

[+] Author and Article Information
K. Boomsma, D. Poulikakos

Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Center, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland

J. Fluids Eng 124(1), 263-272 (Aug 24, 2001) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1429637 History: Received January 29, 2001; Revised August 24, 2001
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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(a) Aluminum foam block which measures 10.0 cm×4.0 cm×1.5 cm, 92% porous (10 pores per linear inch=6.9 mm pore diameter); (b) magnified view of a single pore from Fig. 1(a);(c) aluminum foam block as depicted in Fig. 1(a), but compressed by a factor of four, which decreased the porosity from 92% to 76.1%; (d) magnified view of the foam in Fig. 1(c).
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Diagram of the experimental apparatus used to measure the pressure drop over various configurations of metal foam
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(a) Metal foam test housing cross-sectional view of the inlet, outlet, and foam positioning during the pressure-drop characterization experiments. (b) Top view of the metal foam test housing with the lid removed for clarity.
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The expected compressed metal foam porosities based on the precompression porosity and nominal compression factors are graphically compared against the measured values
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(a) The experimentally obtained pressure-drop data are plotted along with the fitted curves for the 95-series compressed foam blocks. The experimental uncertainty values are 0.22 bar/m in the length-normalized pressure measurement, 0.0088 bar in the actual pressure measurement, and 0.013 m/s in the fluid flow velocity measurement. (b) the experimentally obtained pressure-drop data are plotted along with the fitted curves for the 92-series compressed foam blocks. The experimental uncertainty values are 0.22 bar/m in the length-normalized pressure measurement, 0.0088 bar in the actual pressure measurement, and 0.013 m/s in the fluid flow velocity measurement.
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The permeability of compressed foams is plotted against the values of the measured porosity. The uncertainty values for the permeabilities are gives in Table 2, and the uncertainty value of the measured porosity is estimated at a conservative 3%.
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Pressure-drop versus fluid flow velocity for the three uncompressed metal foams. The experimental uncertainty values are 0.0125 bar/m in the length-normalized pressure measurement, 0.001 bar in the actual pressure measurement, and 0.004 m/s in the fluid flow velocity measurement.
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(a) The quantity (ΔP/Lv) for the 10 PPI foam (6.9 mm pore diameter) is plotted to show the pressure-drop deviation from Darcy’s law at fluid flow velocities greater than 0.101 m/s. The discrete points represent the experimental data, and the straight line is the corresponding quadratic curve-fit. (b) The quantity (ΔP/Lv) for the 20 PPI foam (3.6 mm pore diameter) is plotted to show the pressure-drop deviation from Darcy’s law at fluid flow velocities greater than 0.110 m/s. The discrete points represent the experimental data, and the straight line is the corresponding quadratic curve-fit. (c) The quantity (ΔP/Lv) for the 40 PPI foam (2.3 mm pore diameter) is plotted to show the pressure-drop deviation from Darcy’s law at fluid flow velocities greater than 0.074 m/s. The discrete points represent the experimental data, and the straight line is the corresponding quadratic curve-fit.
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Plot of the permeability, K, for the compressed aluminum foam blocks using a maximum flow velocity which corresponds to the velocity value at which the K value is plotted
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Plot of the form coefficient, C, for the compressed aluminum foam blocks using a maximum flow velocity which corresponds to the velocity value at which the C value is plotted
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Plot of the permeability, K, for the uncompressed aluminum foam blocks using a maximum flow velocity which corresponds to the velocity value at which the K value is plotted
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Plot of the form coefficient, C, for the uncompressed aluminum foam blocks using a maximum flow velocity which corresponds to the velocity value at which the C value is plotted

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