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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Development of a Steady Vortex Generator Jet in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

[+] Author and Article Information
Gregory S. Rixon, Hamid Johari

Mechanical Engineering Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609e-mail: hjohari@wpi.edu

J. Fluids Eng 125(6), 1006-1015 (Jan 12, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1627833 History: Received July 12, 2002; Revised August 02, 2003; Online January 12, 2004
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Schematic of a vortex generator jet and associated coordinate system. The pitch angle is α and the skew angle is β.
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Schematic of the water tunnel test section and the experimental setup
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Instantaneous vorticity fields at x/δ=0.7; (a) VR=1, minimum |ω| contour is 2 s−1 with an increment of 1 s−1 ; (b) VR=3, minimum |ω| contour is 2 s−1 with an increment of 2 s−1 . Vorticity in the CW direction is indicated by solid contours. Arrows on the y-axes indicate the approximate location of the undisturbed boundary layer edge.
Grahic Jump Location
An instantaneous vorticity field of a VR=3 jet at x/δ=4.2, minimum |ω| contour is 2 s−1 with an increment of 2 s−1
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Temporal variation of peak streamwise vorticity in the primary vortex of a VR=3 jet at x/δ=0.7. The straight line denotes the average value.
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Dependence of peak streamwise vorticity on velocity ratio (a) and downstream location (b). The straight lines in (b) have the same slope and indicate exponential decay.
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Instantaneous vortex core locations for a VR=3 jet at x/δ=4.2. The average location is represented by the solid square.
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Wall-normal vortex core location as a function of velocity ratio (a) and downstream location (b). The solid curves in (b) are power-law fits. The dashed line represents the approximate extent of the (undisturbed) boundary layer logarithmic region.
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Co-located velocity and vorticity fields of a VR=3 jet at (a) x/δ=0.7, and (b) x/δ=4.2; minimum |ω| contour is 2 s−1 with a 2 s−1 increment. CW Vorticity is indicated by solid contours.
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Dependence of primary vortex circulation on velocity ratio VR (a) and downstream location (b). The straight lines in (b) represent exponential fits.
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Circulation as a function of vorticity contour level for a VR=3 jet at x/δ=0.7
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Circulation distribution on concentric circles for (a) a VR=1 jet at x/δ=0.7 and (b) a VR=3 jet at x/δ=4.2. The curves represent Eq. (3) fitted to the data.
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Dependence of effective vortex radius a on velocity ratio VR (a) and downstream location (b). The curve in (b) corresponds to Eq. (5).
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of peak vorticity of time-averaged data as a function of downstream location for a VR=1 jet. Open circles represent solid vortex generator data. The solid curve is a power-law fit to our data (0.78(x/δ)−0.56). The dashed curve is an exponential fit to the solid vortex generator data. The jet pitch and skew angles for Ref. 31 are shown in the legend. All other jets have a 45 deg pitch and 90 deg skew angle.

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