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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Swing Check Valve Characterization and Modeling During Transients

[+] Author and Article Information
Guohua Li, Jim C. P. Liou

Department of Civil Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1022

J. Fluids Eng 125(6), 1043-1050 (Jan 12, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1625689 History: Received January 15, 2003; Revised June 23, 2003; Online January 12, 2004
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

Uram, E. M., 1977, “A Method for Estimating Steam Hammer Effects on Swing-Check Valves During Closure,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, Paper No. 76-JPGC-PWR-6.
Safwat, H. H., Arastu, A. H., and Noman, A., 1985, “Study of Check Valve Slamming in a BWR Feedwater System Following a Postulated Pipe Break,” Forum on Unsteady Flow, ASME, New York, pp. 13–15.
Arastu, A. H., and Husaini, S. M., 1995, “A Comprehensive Check Valve Dynamic Model for Water Hammer Applications,” Proceedings of the ASME Fluids Engineering Division, ASME, New York, FED-Vol. 234, pp. 45–50.
Kane,  R. S., and Cho,  S. M., 1976, “Hydraulic Performance of Tilting-Disk Check Valves,” J. Hydraul. Div., Am. Soc. Civ. Eng., HY1, pp. 57–72.
Koch, B., 1981, “Computer Simulation of Water Hammer Applied to Check Valves and Valve Stroking in Pipe Networks,” paper presented at the Conference on Computer Simulation, Harrogate, May 13–15.
Rahmeyer,  W. J., 1993, “Sizing Swing Check Valves for Stability and Minimum Velocity Limits,” ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 115, pp. 406–410.
Botros,  K. K., Jones,  B. J., and Roorda,  O., 1997, “Effects of Compressibility on Flow Characteristics and Dynamics of Swing Check Valves—Part 1,” ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 119, pp. 192–198.
Botros,  K. K., and Roorda,  O., 1997, “Effects of Compressibility on Flow Characteristics and Dynamics of Swing Check Valves—Part II,” ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 119, pp. 199–206.
Esleek, S. H., and Rosser, R. M., 1959, “Check Valve Water Hammer Characteristics,” paper presented at the American Nuclear Society Meeting, Nov.
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Provoost, G. A., 1980, “The Dynamic Behavior of Non-Return Valves,” Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Pressure Surges, BHRA, Canterbury, England, pp. 415–428.
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Koetzier, H., Kruisbrink, A. C. H., and Lavooij, C. S. W., 1986, “Dynamic Behavior of Large Non-Return Valves,” Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Pressure Surges, BHRA, Hannover, Germany, pp. 237–244.
Thorley, A. R. D., 1983, “Dynamic Response of Check Valves,” Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Pressure Surges, BHRA, Bath, England, pp. 231–242.
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Figures

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Definition of variables associated with a swing check valve
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The schematic of the test rig
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Replacement shaft and measuring devices (left: potentiometer, right: accelerometer)
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Estimated static frictional torque
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Stationary hydraulic torque coefficients; (a) disk angle versus through flow velocity, (b) stationary coefficient versus disk angle, (c) stationary coefficient versus Reynolds number, (d) stationary coefficient for forward and reverse flows
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Results in quadrant 3 (V=−0.41 m/s); (a) disk angle versus time, (b) disk velocity versus disk angle, (c) disk acceleration versus disk angle, (d) rotational coefficient versus disk angle
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Results in quadrant 4 (V=0.76 m/s); (a) disk angle versus time, (b) disk velocity versus disk angle, (c) disk acceleration versus disk angle, (d) rotational coefficient versus disk angle
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Rotational coefficients in quadrants 3 and 4. The disk angles are 10, 20, and 30 deg for the top, middle, and bottom traces in panels (a) and (b) 20, 30, and 40 deg for panels (c) and (d) 40, 50, and 60 deg for panels (e) and (f).
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Inherent hydraulic characteristic of the check valve
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Ratio hydraulic torque in the Cv model over stationary hydraulic torque
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Comparisons between simulation results and test data (steady state through flow velocity=1.93 m/s)
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Simulated disk velocity and torque components (steady-state through flow velocity=1.93 m/s)

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