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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Assessment of Reynolds-Averaged Turbulence Models for Prediction of the Flow and Heat Transfer in an Inlet Vane-Endwall Passage

[+] Author and Article Information
Hugo D. Pasinato, Kyle D. Squires, Ramendra P. Roy

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Arizona State University, Box 876106, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106

J. Fluids Eng 126(3), 305-315 (Jul 12, 2004) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1760535 History: Received April 25, 2003; Revised November 20, 2003; Online July 12, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
View of the hub endwall in the vicinity of the vane leading edge and slots for secondary air injection. (a) plan view; (b) side view showing plane L1. The four planes for which solutions are analyzed in more detail shown in the plan view. Streamwise (x), distances in meters.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation in the skin friction coefficient with grid resolution, baseline configuration. (a) plane L1, the vane leading edge coincides with the right vertical boundary in the figure; (b) plane S3, the view is into the passage from upstream with the suction side of the vane coinciding with the left vertical boundary of the frame, the coordinate ζ is defined in the plane (c.f., Fig. 1). Horizontal axis dimensions in meters. □ 2.5×105 cells; ▿ 4.75×105 cells; ○ 9×105 cells; ⋄ 1.9×106 cells.
Grahic Jump Location
Streamlines and contours of the dimensionless temperature θ=(T−Tw)/(T−Tw) in plane L1, baseline flow. The vane leading edge coincides with the right vertical boundary of each frame, axis dimensions are in meters. (a) S-A; (b) RNG k-ε; (c) RSM.
Grahic Jump Location
Coherent structures in plane S2, baseline flow. View is into the passage from upstream (suction surface on the left vertical boundary, pressure surface of adjacent vane on the right vertical boundary of the frame), axis dimensions in meters. (a) S-A; (b) RNG k-ε; (c) RSM. Structures identified in the S-A prediction, 1: suction-side leg of the horseshoe vortex; 2: pressure-side leg of the horseshoe vortex from the adjacent vane; 3: counter-rotating structure induced beneath the suction-side leg; 4: counter-rotating structure induced beneath the pressure-side leg; 5: corner vortex adjacent to the pressure surface of the adjacent vane; 6: vortical structure induced along the vane suction surface.
Grahic Jump Location
Coherent structures in plane S3, baseline flow. View is into the passage from upstream (suction surface on the left vertical boundary of the frame), axis dimensions in meters. (a) Spalart-Allmaras; (b) RNG k-ε; (c) RSM. Structures identified in the S-A prediction, 1: suction-side leg of the horseshoe vortex; 2: pressure-side leg of the horseshoe vortex from the adjacent vane; 3: evolution of the counter-rotating structure induced beneath the suction-side leg shown in plane S2; 4: coherent structure from the neighboring passage.
Grahic Jump Location
Hub-endwall Stanton number distribution, baseline configuration. (a) Spalart-Allmaras; (b) RNG k-ε; (c) RSM; (d) measured.
Grahic Jump Location
Influence of Prt on the hub-endwall Stanton number distribution, baseline configuration. Predictions obtained using the S-A model. (a) Prt=0.8; (b) Prt=0.9; (c) Prt=1.
Grahic Jump Location
Streamlines and contours of the dimensionless temperature θ=(T−Tw)/(T−Tw) (in a), and contours of the coherent structures (in b) in plane L1, BR=1.3. Predictions obtained using S-A model. The vane leading edge coincides with the right vertical boundary of each frame, axis dimensions are in meters.
Grahic Jump Location
Streamlines and contours of the coherent structures in plane S1. View is into the passage from upstream (suction surface on the left vertical boundary of the frame), axis dimensions in meters. Predictions obtained using the S-A model. (a) baseline; (b) BR=1.3.
Grahic Jump Location
Streamlines and contours of the dimensionless temperature θ=(T−Tw)/(T−Tw) in plane S1. View is into the passage from upstream (suction surface on the left vertical boundary of the frame), axis dimensions in meters. Predictions obtained using the S-A model. (a) baseline; (b) BR=1.3.
Grahic Jump Location
Hub-endwall Stanton number and cooling effectiveness, BR=1.3. (a)-(b) Spalart-Allmaras; (c)-(d) RNG k-ε; (e)-(f ) measured.

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