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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Numerical Analysis of High-Speed Bodies in Partially Cavitating Axisymmetric Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Abraham N. Varghese

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, RI

James S. Uhlman, Ivan N. Kirschner

Anteon Corporation Engineering, Engineering Technology Center Mystic, CT

J. Fluids Eng 127(1), 41-54 (Mar 22, 2005) (14 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1852473 History: Received November 02, 2002; Revised November 20, 2003; Online March 22, 2005
Copyright © 2005 by ASME
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References

Efros,  D. A., 1946, “Hydrodynamic Theory of Two-Dimensional Flow With Cavitation,” Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 51, pp. 267–270.
Tulin,  M. P., 1964, “Supercavitating Flows—Small Perturbation Theory,” J. Ship Res., 7, p. 3.
Cuthbert, J., and Street, R., 1964, “An Approximate Theory for Supercavitating Flow About Slender Bodies of Revolution,” LMSC Report, TM81-73/39, Lockheed Missiles and Space Co., Sunnyvale, CA.
Brennan,  C., 1969, “A Numerical Solution of Axisymmetric Cavity Flows,” J. Fluid Mech., 37, p. 4.
Chou,  Y. S., 1974, “Axisymmetric Cavity Flows Past Slender Bodies of Revolution,” J. Hydronautics,8, p. 1.
Vorus, W. S., 1991, “A Theoretical Study of the Use of Supercavitation/Ventilation for Underwater Body Drag Reduction,” VAI Technical Report, Vorus & Associates, Inc., Gregory, MI.
Kuria, I. M., Kirschner, I. N., Varghese, A. N., and Uhlman, J. S., 1997, “Compressible Cavity Flows Past Slender Non-Lifting Bodies of Revolution,” Proceedings of the ASME & JSME Fluids Engineering Annual Conference & Exhibition, Cavitation and Multiphase Flow Forum, FEDSM97-3262, Vancouver, BC.
Uhlman,  J. S., 1987, “The Surface Singularity Method Applied to Partially Cavitating Hydrofoils,” J. Ship Res., 31, p. 2.
Uhlman,  J. S., 1989, “The Surface Singularity or Boundary Integral Method Applied to Supercavitating Hydrofoils,” J. Ship Res., 33, p. 1.
Kinnas, S. A., and Fine, N. E., 1990, “Nonlinear Analysis of the Flow Around Partially and Super-Cavitating Hydrofoils by a Potential Based Panel Method,” Proceedings of the IABEM-90 Symposium, International Association for Boundary Element Methods, Rome, Italy.
Kinnas,  S. A., and Fine,  N. E., 1993, “A Numerical Nonlinear Analysis of the Flow Around Two- and Three-Dimensional Partially Cavitating Hydrofoils,” J. Fluid Mech., 254, pp. 151–181.
Varghese, A. N., Uhlman, J. S., and Kirschner, I. N., 1997, “Axisymmetric Slender-Body Analysis of Supercavitating High-Speed Bodies in Subsonic Flow,” Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Performance Enhancement for Marine Applications, T. Gieseke, editor, Newport, RI.
Kirschner, I. N., Uhlman, J. S., Varghese, A. N., and Kuria, I. M., 1995, “Supercavitating Projectiles in Axisymmetric Subsonic Liquid Flows,” Proceedings of the ASME & JSME Fluids Engineering Annual Conference & Exhibition, Cavitation and Multiphase Flow Forum, FED 210, J. Katz and Y. Matsumoto, editors, Hilton Head Island, SC.
Uhlman, J. S., Varghese, A. N., and Kirschner, I. N., 1998, “Boundary Element Modeling of Axisymmetric Supercavitating Bodies,” Proceedings of the 1st Symposium on Marine Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics, Hydrodynamic/Hydroacoustic Technology Center, McLean, VA.
Savchenko, Y. N., Semenenko, V. N., Naumova, Y. I., Varghese, A. N., Uhlman, J. S., and Kirschner, I. N., 1997, “Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Polygonal Contours in Supercavitating Flow,” Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Performance Enhancement for Marine Applications, T. Gieseke, editor, Newport, RI.
Krasnov, V. K., 2002, “The Movement of an Axisymmetrical Solid With Formation of a Cavity,” Proceedings of the 2002 International Summer Scientific School on High-Speed Hydrodynamics, Chuvash National Academy of Science and Art, Cheboksary, Russia.
Varghese, A. N., 1999, “Boundary-Element Modeling of Partial Cavitating and Supercavitating High-Speed Bodies,” presentation in the Proceedings of the 1999 ONR Workshop on Supercavitating High-Speed Bodies, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Newport, RI.
Varghese, A. N., and Uhlman, J. S., 2000, “Advanced Physics Modeling of Supercavitating High-Speed Bodies,” in “FY99 Annual In-House Laboratory Independent Research Annual Report,” NUWC-NPT Working Memorandum 8007 dated 17 April, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport, RI.
Tulin, M. P., 2001, “Supercavitation: An Overview,” Lecture Notes for the RTO AVT/VKI Special Course on Supercavitating Flows, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Rhode Saint Genèse, Belgium.
Hoerner, S. F., 1965, Fluid-Dynamic Drag, Hoerner Fluid Dynamics, Brick Town, NJ.
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Figures

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Partial cavitation problem
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Cavity shapes for different cavity lengths (dimensionless body radius: 0.9; dimensionless body length: 40)
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Cavity length versus cavitation number on (a) linear and (b) logarithmic scales (dimensionless body radius: 0.9; dimensionless body length: 40)
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(a) Surface pressure distribution and (b) cavity shape for different cavity lengths (dimensionless body length: 5; dimensionless body radius: 0.8); see text for discussion of pressure spikes
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Cavity shapes for various body radii (dimensionless body length: 40; dimensionless cavity length: 30)
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Riabouchinski wall height versus (a) body radius and (b) cavity length (dimensionless body length: 40)
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Maximum body radius (resolved in increments of 0.1) for nonnegative Riabouchinski wall height as a function of cavity length
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Minimum cavity length for which convergence was achieved versus body radius (dimensionless body length: 40)
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Cavity length versus cavitation number (a) for bodies of different radii (dimensionless body length: 40); (b) comparison with the zero-caliber ogive experiments of Billet and Weir (1975)
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Cavity length versus cavitation number for cavity termination on the conical forebody, comparing partial cavitation with supercavitation (dimensionless body length: 80; cone angle: 6.96 deg)
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Cavity length versus (a) cavitation number and (b) reciprocal of cavitation number for three different cone angles (dimensionless body length: 80; dimensionless body radius: 1.2)
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Numerical analysis of high-speed bodies in partially cavitating flow
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Drag coefficient versus cavity length (dimensionless body length: 80; dimensionless body radius: 1.2; cone angle: 9.55 deg; Reynolds number: 3.0e7)
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Drag coefficient versus cavity length (dimensionless body length: 80; dimensionless body radius: 1.2; cone angle: 15.92 deg; Reynolds number: 3.0e7)
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Cavity shapes for different maximum dimensionless body radii (dimensionless body length: 80; cavitation number: 0.15; cone angle: 15.92 deg)
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Dimensionless cavity length and drag components versus dimensionless body radius (dimensionless body length: 80; cavitation number: 0.1; cone angle: 15.92 deg)
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Base and total drag coefficients versus cavity length (dimensionless body length: 40; dimensionless body radius: 0.9; Reynolds number: 3.0e7) comparing the base-separated and base-cavitating flow cases
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Bivariate surface fit of cavity length as a function of cavitation number and cylinder radius (results strictly applicable to a dimensionless body length of 40; computed using Eq. (7); original numerical data plotted as markers)

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