0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

Cavitation Properties of Oils Under Dynamic Stressing by Tension

[+] Author and Article Information
P. R. Williams, R. L. Williams

 Centre for Complex Fluids Processing, School of Engineering, University of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK

J. Fluids Eng 127(2), 282-289 (Oct 29, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1881692 History: Received August 11, 2003; Revised October 29, 2004

We report measurements of the effective tensile strength Fc of commercial “multigrade” oils (in the SAE viscosity grades 5W-30 and 10W-40) over a range of temperatures T, which are representative of those encountered under their normal operating conditions (in the range 20°CT140°C). Also reported are the values of Fc that are obtained for Newtonian silicone oils over a range of shear viscosities. In the experiments reported herein, samples of liquid are subjected to dynamic stressing by a pressure-tension cycle, this being a feature of the conditions experienced by a lubricant within a dynamically loaded journal bearing and the method used to estimate Fc avoids reliance on direct measurements of substantial dynamic tensions using conventional pressure transducers.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the B-P apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

The B-P apparatus (with heating jacket removed)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

A typical pressure record obtained from a 603B transducer in an experiment on silicone oil. The pressure transducer output is in ADC units, positive values of which correspond to positive pressure and vice versa. The record contains the primary (1-2) and secondary pressure-tension cycles (3-4, 5-6, etc).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Results of a numerical integration of Eq. 1 illustrating the response of a cavity nucleus (initially at rest) to a pressure variation that represents the primary pressure-tension cycle generated in the experiments. The resulting change in cavity radius involves several oscillatory cycles of gradually diminishing amplitude and period.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Results of experiments on degassed, deionized water. The pressure-tension cycles were recorded using the KP-136 at a sampling rate of 1 MHz (solid line). The pulses F1 and F2 recorded at 1 MHz appear as a single tension pulse at a (simulated) 10 kHz sampling rate.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

The time interval τi as a function of applied static pressure Ps (in psi) for degassed, deionised water. Also shown is the value of the time interval τ0 used to estimate Fc.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

The time interval τi as a function of applied static pressure P5 (in psi) for two silicone oils of different shear viscosities (1 and 350 cS)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

The time interval τi as a function of applied static pressure Ps (in psi) for SAE 10W-40 petrol oil at two temperatures, 20°C and 90°C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

The time interval τi as a function of applied static pressure Ps (in psi) for SAE 10W-40 diesel oil at two temperatures, 20°C and 90°C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

The time interval τi as a function of applied static pressure Ps (in psi) for SAE 5W-30 petrol oil at two temperatures, 20°C and 90°C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Pressure record obtained in the dynamic stressing of an SAE 10W-40 petrol oil at 120°C and atmospheric pressure

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In