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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A New Class of Synthetic Jet Actuators—Part II: Application to Flow Separation Control

[+] Author and Article Information
J. L. Gilarranz, L. W. Traub, O. K. Rediniotis

Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A&M University College Station, Texas 77843-3141, USA

J. Fluids Eng 127(2), 377-387 (May 10, 2005) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1882393 History: Received August 21, 2003; Revised July 28, 2004; Online May 10, 2005
Copyright © 2005 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Wind tunnel model: (a) Geometric details. (b) Internal assembly details of the wing showing the ESP pressure scanner and the synthetic jet actuator. (c) Assembled wing showing the SJA exit slot location.
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Final configuration of the wind-tunnel experimental setup
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Effect of the synthetic jet actuator on the aerodynamic performance of the test wing. Lift coefficient (CL) vs angle of attack (α).
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Effect of the synthetic jet actuator on the aerodynamic performance of the test wing. Percentage change in the lift coefficient (ΔCL) vs angle of attack (α).
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Effect of synthetic jet actuator on the aerodynamic performance of the test wing. Drag coefficient (CD) vs lift coefficient (CL).
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Effect of synthetic jet actuator on the aerodynamic performance of the test wing. Pitching moment coefficient (CM) vs lift coefficient (CL).
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Flow visualization over the wing at α=25 deg and a free-stream velocity of 35 m/s: (a) without SJA actuation and (b) with SJA actuation at 120 Hz
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Oil surface flow visualization of the test wing. Synthetic jet actuator operating at a frequency of 120 Hz. Wind tunnel off (U=0 m/s).
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Oil surface flow visualization of the test wing at α=12 deg, U=35 m/s. (a) corresponds to no control, and (b) corresponds to control at 120 Hz.
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Oil surface flow visualization of the test wing at α=16 deg, U=35 m/s. (a) corresponds to no control (U from right), and (b) corresponds to control at 120 Hz (U from the top).
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Oil surface flow visualization of the test wing at α=20 deg, U=35 m/s. (a) corresponds to no control (U from right), while (b) and (c) correspond to control at 120 Hz (U from the top).
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Effects of synthetic jet actuation on the wing surface pressure distribution at U=35 m/s and for the following angles of attack: (a) 8.75 deg, (b) 12.6 deg, (c) 15.7 deg, (d) 16.6 deg, (e) 17.6 deg, (f) 18.6 deg, (g) 19.4 deg, (h) 25.4 deg, (i) 26.4 deg, (j) α=27.3 deg, (k) 28.4 deg
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Wake surveys at a free stream of U=35 m/s and at the following angles of attack: (a) 0.0 deg, (b) 8.0 deg, (c) 12.0 deg, (d) 16.0 deg, (e) 18.0 deg, and (f) 20.0 deg

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