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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Unstructured Grid Based Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Method for Liquid Tank Sloshing

[+] Author and Article Information
Shin Hyung Rhee

 Fluent, Inc., 10 Cavendish Ct., Lebanon, NH 03766shr@fluent.com

J. Fluids Eng 127(3), 572-582 (Feb 15, 2005) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1906267 History: Revised February 15, 2005

The present study is concerned with liquid tank sloshing at low filling level conditions. The volume of fluid method implemented in a Navier–Stokes computational fluid dynamics code is employed to handle the free-surface flow of liquid sloshing. The geometric reconstruction scheme for the interface representation is employed to ensure sharpness at the free surface. The governing equations are discretized by second order accurate schemes on unstructured grids. Several different computational approaches are verified and numerical uncertainties are assessed. The computational results are validated against existing experimental data, showing good agreement. The capability is demonstrated for a generic membrane-type liquefied natural gas carrier tank with a simplified pump tower inside. The validation results suggest that the present computational approach is both easy to apply and accurate enough for more realistic problems.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Geometry of the tank and positions of pressure taps shown in the x-y plane

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Figure 2

Geometry of the generic LNG tank

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Figure 3

Base line 2D structured grid for rectangular tank cases

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Figure 4

A 2D unstructured grid for rectangular tank cases

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Figure 5

Partial view of the generic LNG tank grid

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Figure 6

Comparison of static pressure histories at P1 with and without turbulence

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Figure 7

Comparison of 2D free-surface shapes from solutions with and without turbulence

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Figure 8

Contours of turbulent fluctuation

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Figure 9

A 3D free-surface shape at a certain instant

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Figure 10

Comparison of static pressure histories at P1 from 2D and 3D solutions

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Figure 11

Comparison of 2D free-surface shapes from solutions on the base line structured and unstructured grids

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Figure 12

Comparison of static pressure histories at P1 from GR and HRIC solutions

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Figure 13

Comparison of 2D free-surface shapes from the experiment and computation

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Figure 14

Comparison of static pressure histories at P1 (top), P2 (middle), and P3 (bottom)—sway-base case

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Figure 15

Total force history on the right hand side wall—sway-base case

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Figure 16

Comparison of static pressure histories at P1 (top), P2 (middle), and P3 (bottom)—sway-short case

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Figure 17

Comparison of static pressure histories at P1 (top), P2 (middle), and P3 (bottom)—roll-base case

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Figure 18

Comparison of static pressure histories at P1 (top), P2 (middle), and P3 (bottom)—roll-short case

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Figure 19

Snapshots of free-surface shape at different time steps: 8.12s (upper); 13.52s (lower)

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Figure 20

Static pressure history at P

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