0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

Numerical Investigation of Multistage Viscous Micropump Configurations

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Abdelgawad, N. Esmail, P. Phutthavong

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering,  Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada, H3G 1M8

I. Hassan1

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering,  Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada, H3G 1M8Hassan@me.concordia.ca

1

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Fluids Eng 127(4), 734-742 (Apr 14, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1949639 History: Received January 06, 2004; Revised March 10, 2005; Accepted April 14, 2005

The viscous micropump consists of a cylinder placed eccentrically inside a microchannel, where the rotor axis is perpendicular to the channel axis. When the cylinder rotates, a net force is transferred to the fluid because of the unequal shear stresses on the upper and lower surfaces of the rotor. Consequently, this causes the surrounding fluid in the channel to displace toward the microchannel outlet. The simplicity of the viscous micropump renders it ideal for micropumping; however, previous studies have shown that its performance is still less than what is required for various applications. The performance of the viscous micropump, in terms of flow rate and pressure capabilities, may be enhanced by implementing more than one rotor into the configuration either horizontally or vertically oriented relative to each other. This is analogous to connecting multiple pumps in parallel or in series. The present study will numerically investigate the performance of various configurations of the viscous micropumps with multiple rotors, namely, the dual-horizontal rotor, triple-horizontal rotor, symmetrical dual-vertical rotor, and eight-shaped dual-vertical rotor. The development of drag-and-lift forces with time, as well as the viscous resisting torque on the cylinders were studied. In addition, the corresponding drag, lift, and moment coefficients were calculated. The flow pattern and pressure distribution on the cylinders’ surfaces are also included in the study. Results show that the symmetrical dual-vertical rotor configuration yields the best efficiency and generates the highest flow rate. The steady-state performance of the single-stage micropump was compared to the available experimental and numerical data and found to be in very good agreement. This work provides a foundation for future research on the subject of fluid phenomena in viscous micropumps.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the micropump geometry for the single rotor (9)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Comparison of average velocity versus channel height for the single rotor (Re=0.5,ΔP*=0.5 and ϵ=0.9) (9)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Comparison of average velocity versus eccentricity at ΔP*=1 and Re=1 for the single rotor (9)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Mesh used for the dual-horizontal-rotor viscous micropump

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Comparison of the variation of velocity with time for the dual-horizontal rotor for different rotor spacing with that for the single rotor (S=1.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Streamlines for different rotor spacing of the dual-horizontal rotor (S=1.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Streamlines at different times at λ=0.5 for the dual-horizontal rotor (S=1.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Variation of the drag coefficient with time on rotors 1 and 2 for different rotor spacing of the dual-horizontal rotor (S=1.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Viscous, pressure, and total drag coefficients for ϵ=0.4 in the single-rotor viscous micropump. (S=1.5,ΔP*=0, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Total moment coefficient at different rotor spacing of the dual-horizontal rotor (S=1.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Comparison of the efficiency at different rotor spacing of the dual-horizontal rotor

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Flow field around rotors in the single-rotor, dual-horizontal-rotor, and triple-horizontal-rotor viscous micropump

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Average velocity versus pressure load for the single, dual-horizontal and triple-horizontal rotors (S=1.5,ϵ=0.95, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Variation of the streamlines for the symmetrical dual-vertical-rotor viscous micropump with time (S=2.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Comparison of the variation of the average velocity with time for the symmetrical dual-vertical rotor with that for the single rotor (S=2.5,ϵ=0.95, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Streamlines in the eight-shaped dual-vertical-rotor micropump for different S (ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Comparison of the shear stress distribution on lower and upper rotors of the eight-shaped rotor with that on the single rotor (S=2.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10, and Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Moment coefficient on lower and upper rotors compared to the single rotor (S=2.5,ϵ=0.95,ΔP*=10,Re=1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Comparison of the Q-P curves of all the multistage viscous micropumps to the single-rotor viscous micropump

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 20

Comparison of the efficiency for all the multistage viscous micropumps tested

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In