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SPECIAL SECTION ON RANS/LES/DES/DNS: THE FUTURE PROSPECTS OF TURBULENCE MODELING

Detached-Eddy Simulation of High-Reynolds-Number Beveled-Trailing-Edge Boundary Layers and Wakes

[+] Author and Article Information
Eric G. Paterson

Computational Mechanics Division, Applied Research Laboratory and Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, P.O. Box 30, PA 16804, USAeric-paterson@psu.edu

Leonard J. Peltier

Computational Mechanics Division, Applied Research Laboratory and Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, P.O. Box 30, PA 16804, USApeltierlj@psu.edu

J. Fluids Eng 127(5), 897-906 (May 10, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2012501 History: Received July 27, 2004; Revised May 10, 2005

Flow over three different trailing-edge geometries is studied using incompressible detached-eddy simulation and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes CFD methods. Of interest is the ability of DES, coupled, with localized overset-grid refinement, to resolve the proper physics of separated flows from trailing edges—trailing-edge turbulence and vortex shedding, in particular. The DES model is shown to provide a good qualitative description of the trailing-edge flow. However, the modeled separations are overly energetic due to premature separation related to artificially low turbulence levels from upstream. The transition from RANS to DES is isolated as an issue. The simulated physics of the wake are shown to be in agreement with other LES studies: the model produces the “rib/roller” structures representing the first instability modes, horseshoe vortices are observed, and in regions of high resolution, small scales are formed, as expected. The turbulence statistics are qualitatively similar to benchmark data near the trailing edge and in the near wake, however, quantitative comparisons of urms show an over prediction in magnitude of 50%–100%. Despite this, the results are promising, and future modeling efforts have been motivated and identified.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Geometry of trailing-edge variants

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Figure 2

Typical σ contours

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Figure 3

Surface grid illustrating spanwise resolution in RANS and DES regions

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Figure 4

Instantaneous URANS axial-velocity contours for 45° bevel, 25° bevel, and 25° knuckle

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Figure 5

Instantaneous DES flow field: perspective view of isosurface of intrinsic swirl (isolevel=3) shaded by normalized helicity for 25° bevel

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Figure 6

Instantaneous DES flow field: top view of isosurface of intrinsic swirl (isolevel=3) shaded by normalized helicity

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Figure 7

Mean velocity field: contours of axial velocity and streamlines

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Figure 8

Turbulent kinetic energy 25° bevel: URANS and total, subgrid, and resolvable DES components

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Figure 9

Turbulent kinetic energy 45° bevel: URANS and total, subgrid, and resolvable DES components

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Figure 10

Turbulent kinetic energy 25° knuckle: URANS and total, subgrid, and resolvable DES components

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Figure 11

Velocity profiles at x∕L=0.875 for 25° bevel

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Figure 12

Mean-velocity profile at x∕L=1.106 for 25° bevel

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Figure 13

rms velocity profiles for 25° bevel

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Figure 14

Mean surface-pressure distribution

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Figure 15

p2¯ surface distribution from DES

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Figure 16

Unsteady lift and drag

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Figure 17

Spectral analysis of surface pressure at x∕L=1.025

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