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SPECIAL SECTION ON THE FLUID MECHANICS AND RHEOLOGY OF NONLINEAR MATERIALS AT THE MACRO, MICRO AND NANO SCALE

Swirling Flow of a Viscoelastic Fluid With Free Surface—Part I: Experimental Analysis of Vortex Motion by PIV

[+] Author and Article Information
Jinjia Wei

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049, People’s Republic of China

Fengchen Li

2nd Department, Oshima-lab, Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-5805, Japan

Bo Yu

Oil and Gas Storage and Transportation Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, 102249, People’s Republic of China

Yasuo Kawaguchi1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, China, 278-8510, Japanyasuo@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 128(1), 69-76 (Aug 22, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2136928 History: Received June 25, 2004; Revised August 22, 2005

The swirling flows of water and CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) surfactant solutions (501000ppm) in an open cylindrical container with a rotating disc at the bottom were experimentally investigated by use of a double-pulsed PIV (particle image velocimetry) system. The flow pattern in the meridional plane for water at the present high Reynolds number of 4.3×104 differed greatly from that at low Reynolds numbers, and an inertia-driven vortex was pushed to the corner between the free surface and the cylindrical wall by a counter-rotating vortex caused by vortex breakdown. For the 1000ppm surfactant solution flow, the inertia-driven vortex located at the corner between the bottom and the cylindrical wall whereas an elasticity-driven reverse vortex governed the majority of the flow field. The rotation of the fluid caused a deformation of the free surface with a dip at the center. The dip was largest for the water case and decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. The value of the dip was related to determining the solution viscoelasticity for the onset of drag reduction.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the test facility

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Figure 2

Fitting results of the measured shear viscosities with the Giesekus model

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Figure 3

Secondary flow patterns in the meridional plane

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Figure 4

Free surface shapes for water and surfactant solutions

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Figure 5

Relationship of h∕H with DR for Re=4.3×104

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Figure 6

Radial distributions of the time-averaged tangential velocities

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Figure 7

Vertical tangential velocity profiles along r∕Rw=0.46

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Figure 8

Comparison of N1 and ρUθ2 along r∕Rw=0.91

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Figure 9

Time evolution of the tangential velocities at different radial positions after the rotating disc was stopped

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Figure 10

Time evolution of the tangential velocities at different axial positions after the rotating disc was stopped

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