0
SPECIAL SECTION ON THE FLUID MECHANICS AND RHEOLOGY OF NONLINEAR MATERIALS AT THE MACRO, MICRO AND NANO SCALE

Formation of Taylor Vortex Flow of Polymer Solutions

[+] Author and Article Information
Keizo Watanabe

Graduate School of Technology Management, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588, Japanmot1z019@cc.tuat.ac.jp

Shu Sumio

 JEF Engineering Corporation, 2-1 Suehiro-cho, Turumi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 230-8611, Japansumio-shu@jfe-eng.co.jp

Satoshi Ogata

Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Mechanical Engineering 1-1 Minami Ohsawa, Hachiooji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397, Japanogata-satoshi@c.metro-u.ac.jp

J. Fluids Eng 128(1), 95-100 (Jul 13, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2137350 History: Received August 05, 2004; Revised July 13, 2005

Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was applied for the flow visualization of the formation of a Taylor vortex, which occurred in the gap between two coaxial cylinders. The test fluids were tap water and glycerin 60 %wt solution as Newtonian fluids; polyacrilamide (SeparanAP-30) solutions in the concentration range of 10 to 1000ppm and polyethylene-oxide (PEO15) solutions in the range of 20 to 1000ppm were tested as non-Newtonian fluids. The Reynolds number range in the experiment was 80<Re<4.0×103. The rotating inner cylinder was accelerated under the slow condition (dRe*dt1min1) in order to obtain a Taylor vortex flow in stable primary mode. Flow visualization results showed that the Görtler vortices of half the number of the Taylor cells occurred in the gap when the Taylor vortex flow was formed in the primary mode. In addition, the critical Reynolds number of the polymer solutions increased, where Taylor vortices occur, because the generation of the Görtler vortices was retarded. In high concentration polymer solutions, this effect became remarkable. Measurements of steady-state Taylor cells showed that the upper and lower cells of polymer solutions became larger in wavelength than those of the Newtonian fluids. The Taylor vortex flow of non-Newtonian fluids was analyzed and the result obtained using the Giesekus model agreed with the experimental result.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Flow curve of polymer solutions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Experimental apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Acceleration time of rotating inner cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Forming process of Taylor cells of Separan 100ppm(dRe*∕dt=1min−1, T=13°C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Effect of polymer concentration on vortex generation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

(a) First vortex of Separan solutions and (b) Total axial wavelength of first vortex

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

(a) Taylor cell number; (b) Separan solutions; and (c) PEO solutions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Görtler wavelength of polymer solutions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Apparent viscosity of Separan 100ppm solution

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Analytical results for power law models [γ̇m=0.075(1∕s)]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Analytical results for viscoelastic model [γ̇m=0.075(1∕s)]

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In