0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Computational Study of the Flow Around an Isolated Wheel in Contact With the Ground

[+] Author and Article Information
James McManus

Aerospace Engineering, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK

Xin Zhang

Aerospace Engineering, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UKXZhang@soton.ac.uk

J. Fluids Eng 128(3), 520-530 (Oct 12, 2005) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2175158 History: Received July 14, 2005; Revised October 12, 2005

The flow around an isolated wheel in contact with the ground is computed by the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) method. Two cases are considered, a stationary wheel on a stationary ground and a rotating wheel on a moving ground. The computed wheel geometry is a detailed and accurate representation of the geometry used in the experiments of Fackrell and Harvey. The time-averaged computed flow is examined to reveal both new flow structures and new details of flow structures known from previous experiments. The mechanisms of formation of the flow structures are explained. A general schematic picture of the flow is presented. Surface pressures and pressure lift and drag forces are computed and compared to experimental results and show good agreement. The grid sensitivity of the computations is examined and shown to be small. The results have application to the design of road vehicles.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Section view of wheel showing dimensions (in mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Computational grid on the wheel and road surfaces (fine, 2.94 million cells)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Geometry of the wheel and computational domain

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Surface flow lines on the stationary wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Isosurface of vorticity magnitude Ωd∕U∞=3.5 and streamlines in the upper near wake of the stationary wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Isosurface of vorticity magnitude Ωd∕U∞=3.5 and streamlines in the upper near wake of the rotating wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Isosurface of vorticity magnitude Ωd∕U∞=3.5 and streamlines in the lower separation region of the stationary wheels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Isosurface of vorticity magnitude Ωd∕U∞=3.5 and streamlines in the lower separation region of the rotating wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Isosurface of vorticity magnitude Ωd∕U∞=3.5 and streamlines in the lower near wake of the stationary wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Isosurface of vorticity magnitude Ωd∕U∞=3.5 and streamlines in the lower near wake of the rotating wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Vorticity and velocity vectors in the x∕d=1 plane showing a longitudinal vortex in the lower near wake of the wheel. (a) Stationary. (b) Rotating.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Surface pressure distribution on the centreline of the wheel. (a) Stationary. (b) Rotating. Note that the experimental and computational wheel geometry is different for the stationary wheel.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Sectional pressure force coefficients across the width of the rotating wheel. (a) Lift. (b) Drag. Circled numbers identify pressure tappings.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Streamlines in the z∕d=0 plane of the rotating wheel. (a) RKE, fine. (b) RKE, medium. (c) RKE, coarse. (d) S-A, fine. (e) S-A, medium. (f) S-A, coarse.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Schematic diagrams of the general isolated wheel flow. (a) Stationary. (b) Rotating.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In