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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Miniature Single-Disk Viscous Pump (Single-DVP), Performance Characterization

[+] Author and Article Information
Danny Blanchard, Bruce Gale

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, 50 South Central Campus Drive, Rm. 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Phil Ligrani1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, 50 South Central Campus Drive, Rm. 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112ligrani@mech.utah.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 128(3), 602-610 (Sep 29, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2175167 History: Received April 21, 2005; Revised September 29, 2005

The development and testing of a rotating single-disk viscous pump are described. This pump consists of a 10.16mm diameter spinning disk, and a pump chamber, which are separated by a small gap that forms the fluid passage. The walls of the pump chamber form a C-shaped channel with an inner radius of 1.19mm, an outer radius of 2.38mm, and a depth of 40, 73, 117, or 246μm. Fluid inlet and outlet ports are located at the ends of the C-shaped channel. Experimental flow rate and pressure rise data are obtained for rotational speeds from 100to5000rpm, fluid chamber heights from 40to246μm, flow rates from 0to4.75mlmin, pressure rises from 0to31.1kPa, and fluid viscosities from 1to62mPas. An analytical expression for the net flow rate and pressure rise, as dependent on the fluid chamber geometry, disk rotational speed, and fluid viscosity, is derived and found to agree with the experimental data. The flow rate and pressure rise of the pump vary nearly linearly with rotational speed. The volumetric flow rate does not change significantly with changes in fluid viscosity for the same rotational speed and pumping circuit. Advantages of the disk pumps include simplicity, ease of manufacture, ability to produce continuous flow with a flow rate that does not vary significantly in time, and ability to pump biological samples without significant alteration or destruction of cells, protein suspension, or other delicate matter.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

External and internal views of the single-disk viscous pump

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Figure 2

Configuration of the single-disk viscous pump. The shaded region of the pump chamber is used for the flow analysis.

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Figure 3

Cross-sectional view and assembled view of the disk and disk shaft

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Figure 4

Image of the single-disk viscous pump housing containing the pump chamber. The pump chamber depth or flow passage height is 117μm, with a pump chamber outer radius of 2.38mm.

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Figure 5

Test setup for the single-disk viscous pump

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Figure 6

Variations of pressure rise with flow rate for the single-disk viscous pump with a flow passage height of h=117μm. Working fluid is water.

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Figure 7

Variations of pressure rise with rotational speed for the single-disk viscous pump. Working fluid is water, and Q=0.

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Figure 8

Variations of pressure rise with rotational speed for the single-disk viscous pump with a flow passage height of h=73μm. Working fluid is water, and Q=0.

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Figure 9

Variations of maximum flow rate with rotational speed for the single-disk viscous pump. Working fluid is water.

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Figure 10

Variations of maximum pressure rise with flow passage height for the single-disk viscous pump. Working fluid is water, and Q=0.

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Figure 11

Variations of maximum flow rate with flow passage height for the single-disk viscous pump. Working fluid is water.

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Figure 12

Variations of maximum flow rate with rotational speed variation for the single-disk viscous pump with a flow passage height of 117μm. Working fluid is water or 5W-30 oil.

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Figure 13

Variations of pressure rise with rotational speed for the single-disk viscous pump data shown in Fig. 1. The flow passage height is 117μm, and the working fluid is water or 5W-30 oil.

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Figure 14

Volumetric flow rate and typical size for various micropumps. Typical size is defined as the membrane diameter, disk diameter, or channel width. The data points for the single-DVP are for flow passage heights of h=40, and h=246, at a rotational speed 2500rpm(2-26).

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Figure 15

Pressure rise and flow rate for various micropumps. For all points other than the single-DVP, the data corresponds to the maximum flow rate and maximum pressure. The data shown for the single-DVP are for 5W-30 motor oil at a rotational speed of 2500rpm(2-9,11,13,16-19,22-25).

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