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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Numerical Study of Unsteady Flows in a Scroll Compressor

[+] Author and Article Information
M. M. Cui

 TRANE Air Conditioning, American Standard Companies, La Crosse, WI 54601

J. Fluids Eng 128(5), 947-955 (Feb 21, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2243300 History: Received October 17, 2003; Revised February 21, 2006

Since scroll compressors contain gas pockets whose shapes and sizes change continuously, the flow fields inside the compressors are time dependent and three-dimensional. The spatial and temporal variations inside the gas pockets also induce unsteady flows between the gas pockets. This unsteadiness controls the mechanisms responsible for the behavior of the scroll compressor components and their interactions. The dynamic nature inherent in the scroll compressors affects the performance and reliability of the scroll compressors. To improve and optimize the scroll compressor design for better performance and reliability, information is needed to understand the detailed physics of the unsteady flows inside the scroll compressors. To provide the fundamental information needed, the unsteady flows in a scroll compressor are studied numerically. The system simulated includes upper bearing housing, scrolls, check valve, and discharge plenum. Refrigerant-22 is used as the working fluid. The unsteady flows inside and between the gas pockets are characterized by the instantaneous distributions of field quantities and the area- and mass-averaged parameters.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Flow domain of the scroll compressor: (a) compressor and (b) scroll involute

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Figure 2

Temperature distribution inside the scrolls on a cross section area perpendicular to the z axis: crank angle=(a)0deg, (b) 180deg, (c) 360deg, (d) 540deg

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Figure 3

Vector map on the cross-section area perpendicular to the z axis of a gas pocket: crank angle=(a)0deg, (b) 180deg, (c) 360deg, (d) 540deg

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Figure 4

Pressure distribution inside the scrolls on a cross section area perpendicular to the x axis: crank angle=(a)0deg, (b) 90deg, (c) 180deg, (d) 270deg

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Figure 5

Vector map inside the scrolls on a cross section area perpendicular to the x axis: crank angle=(a)0deg, (b) 90deg, (c) 180deg, (d) 270deg

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Figure 6

Pressure distribution inside the scrolls on a cross section are perpendicular to the z axis: crank angle=(a)0deg, (b) 90deg, (c) 180deg, (d) 270deg

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Figure 7

Vector map inside the scrolls on a cross section area perpendicular to the z axis: crank angle=(a)0deg, (b) 90deg, (c) 180deg, (d) 270deg

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Figure 8

Volume and mass changes in the gas pockets: (a) volume versus wrap angle and (b) mass versus volume

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Figure 9

Volume-averaged pressure (a) and temperature (b) in the gas pockets

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Figure 10

Flank gap width (a) and mass flow rate between pockets (b)

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Figure 11

Pressure difference between two neighboring gas pockets (a) and area-averaged leakage speed through flank gap (b)

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Figure 12

The pressure at the pressure taps (a) and comparison of predicted performance with measured values (b)

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