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TECHNICAL PAPERS

RANS Simulations of a Simplified Tractor/Trailer Geometry

[+] Author and Article Information
Christopher J. Roy

Aerospace Engineering Department, Auburn University, 211 Aerospace Engineering Building, Auburn, AL 36849-5338cjroy@eng.auburn.edu

Jeffrey Payne

Aerosciences and Compressible Fluid Mechanics Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185

Mary McWherter-Payne

Applied Aerospace Engineering and Advanced Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185

J. Fluids Eng 128(5), 1083-1089 (Feb 16, 2006) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2236133 History: Received July 14, 2005; Revised February 16, 2006

Steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are presented for the three-dimensional flow over a simplified tractor/trailer geometry at zero degrees yaw angle. The simulations are conducted using a multi-block, structured computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The turbulence closure model employed is the two-equation Menter k-ω model. The discretization error is estimated by employing two grid levels: a fine mesh of 20 million cells and a coarser mesh of 2.5 million cells. Simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA-Ames 7×10ft wind tunnel. Quantities compared include vehicle drag, surface pressures, and time-averaged velocities in the trailer near wake. The results indicate that the RANS approach is able to accurately predict the surface pressure on the vehicle, with the exception of the base region. The pressure predictions in the base region are poor due to the inability of the RANS model to accurately capture the near-wake vortical structure. However, the gross pressure levels in the base region are in reasonable agreement with experiment, and thus the overall vehicle drag is well predicted.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

GTS model in the NASA Ames 7×10ft wind tunnel (courtesy of Storms (9))

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Figure 2

Coarse grid computational mesh for the GTS geometry

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Figure 3

Wind tunnel side-wall pressure

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Figure 4

Wind tunnel floor boundary layer profiles

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Figure 5

Centerline pressure on the front of the GTS model (coarse and fine meshes)

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Figure 6

Centerline pressure on the base of the trailer (coarse and fine meshes)

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Figure 7

Location of experimental pressure taps (9)

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Figure 8

Centerline surface pressures on the top and bottom of the GTS model

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Figure 9

Surface pressure on the trailer base for various spanwise locations

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Figure 10

Locations of experimental PIV planes (9)

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Figure 11

2D streamlines and contours of streamwise velocity in (a) experiment and (b) computations: vertical streamwise cut (z∕W=0)

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Figure 12

2D streamlines and contours of vertical velocity in (a) experiment and (b) computations: vertical streamwise cut (z∕W=0)

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Figure 13

Profiles of vertical velocity extracted from the vertical streamwise cut (z∕W=0)

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Figure 14

2D streamlines and contours of vertical velocity in (a) experiment and (b) computations: horizontal streamwise cut (y∕W=0.7)

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Figure 15

Profiles of vertical velocity extracted from the horizontal streamwise cut (y∕W=0.7)

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