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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Study of Turbulent Flow Structures of a Practical Steady Engine Head Flow Using Large-Eddy Simulations

[+] Author and Article Information
V. Huijnen1

Section Combustion Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, 5600 MB, NetherlandsV.Huijnen@tue.nl

L. M. Somers, L. P. de Goey

Section Combustion Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, 5600 MB, Netherlands

R. S. Baert2

Section Combustion Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, 5600 MB, Netherlands

C. Olbricht, A. Sadiki, J. Janicka

Chair of Energy and Powerplant Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Darmstadt University of Technology, Peterstr. 30, Darmstadt, D-64287, Germany

1

URL: http://www.combustion.tue.nl

2

Also at TNO Automotive, Powertrains, Delft, The Netherlands.

J. Fluids Eng 128(6), 1181-1191 (Apr 21, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2353259 History: Received December 05, 2005; Revised April 21, 2006

The prediction performance of two computational fluid dynamics codes is compared to each other and to experimental data of a complex swirling and tumbling flow in a practical complex configuration. This configuration consists of a flow in a production-type heavy-duty diesel engine head with 130-mm cylinder bore. One unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS)-based simulation and two large-eddy simulations (LES) with different inflow conditions have been performed with the KIVA-3V code. Two LES with different resolutions have been performed with the FASTEST-3D code. The parallelization of the this code allows for a more resolved mesh compared to the KIVA-3V code. This kind of simulations gives a complete image of the phenomena that occur in such configurations, and therefore represents a valuable contribution to experimental data. The complex flow structures gives rise to an inhomogeneous turbulence distribution. Such inhomogeneous behavior of the turbulence is well captured by the LES, but naturally damped by the URANS simulation. In the LES, it is confirmed that the inflow conditions play a decisive role for all main flow features. When no particular treatment of the flow through the runners can be made, the best results are achieved by computing a large part of the upstream region, once performed with the FASTEST-3D code. If the inflow conditions are tuned, all main complex flow structures are also recovered by KIVA-3V . The application of upwinding schemes in both codes is in this respect not crucial.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Geometry of a cylinder with inflow manifold. (a) KIVA simulations and (b) FASTEST simulations.

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Figure 2

(a) The isosurface of the ⟨w̃⟩ component illustrating the mean swirl. (b) Streamlines illustrating the tumble process. Simulation FASTEST B.

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Figure 3

Location of the plane where the data are evaluated

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Figure 4

⟨w̃⟩-component velocity fields in the plane indicated in Fig. 3. Contour levels are shown in steps of 20m∕s.

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Figure 5

⟨w̃⟩ velocity fields at Z=0.25D below the cylinder head

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Figure 6

⟨w̃⟩ velocity fields at Z=1.25D below the cylinder head

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Figure 7

Mean spanwise velocity fields at Z=1.25D below the cylinder head. (a) Kiva A, (b) Kiva B, (c) FASTEST B, and (d) PIV.

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Figure 8

Mean spanwise velocity fields at Z=1.75D below the cylinder head. (a) Kiva A, (b) Kiva B, (c) FASTEST B, and (d) PIV.

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Figure 13

Energy spectrum and auto-correlation function of the u velocity component at Z=1.75D, x=30mm, y=0mm.

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Figure 14

Simulation FASTEST B. (a, b) Velocities and turbulence intensities at Z=0.25D below the cylinder head. (c, d) The same at Z=1.75D.

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Figure 12

Turbulence intensities at the plane indicated in Fig. 3. (a) Kiva A, (b) Kiva B, (c) Kiva C, and (d) Fastest B.

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Figure 11

Turbulence intensities k at Z=1.25D below the cylinder head. (a) Kiva A, (b) Kiva B, (c) FASTEST B, and (d) PIV.

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Figure 10

Resolved turbulence intensities at Z=1.75D below the cylinder head, along the line indicated in Fig. 8.

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Figure 9

Mean spanwise velocity magnitude at different heights below the cylinder head. (a) Height=0.25D and (b) height=1.75D.

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