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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Optimization of an Innovative Rotary Shaft Pump (RSP)

[+] Author and Article Information
Jacob C. Allen

Donald Schultz Professor of Turbomachinery, Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ, United Kingdomallen.jake@gmail.com

Phillip M. Ligrani

Donald Schultz Professor of Turbomachinery, Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ, United Kingdomphil.ligrani@eng.ox.ac.uk

J. Fluids Eng 128(6), 1281-1288 (Mar 06, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2353273 History: Received June 13, 2005; Revised March 06, 2006

This paper describes the optimization of rotary shaft pump performance, which is accomplished by comparing the performance of four different centrifugal rotary pump configurations: hooked blades pump, backward-curved blades ID=12.7mm pump, contoured base pump, and backward-curved blades ID=19.1mm pump. Each of these devices utilizes a unique and simple impeller design where the blades are directly integrated into a shaft with an outer diameter of 25.4mm. Presented for each pump are performance data including volumetric flow rate, pump head, and hydraulic efficiency. When pumping water, the most optimal arrangement with the hooked impeller blades produces a maximum flow rate of 3.22Lmin and a pump head as high as 0.97m.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Velocity diagrams at the inlet and discharge of a typical centrifugal pump impeller showing absolute fluid velocity V, relative fluid velocity W, impeller blade velocity U, and other velocity components

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Figure 2

Cutaway view of each impeller design tested, showing the inlet, impeller blades, and outlet holes. Cutaway pieces are cross-hatched.

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Figure 3

Impeller design cross sections through the centers of the impeller blades

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Figure 4

Cutaway view of the pump assembly including the impeller, bearings, casing, volute, inlet, and outlet

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Figure 5

Impeller and cross section of bottom bearing showing the arrangement employed to eliminate leakage

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Figure 6

Schematic diagram of the pump setup and data collection instrumentation

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Figure 7

Variation of flow rate with impeller speed for different impeller designs. Here, the outlet valve is completely open and, therefore, the throttling is constant.

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Figure 8

Variation of pressure head with impeller speed for different impeller designs The outlet valve is completely open, and therefore, the throttling is constant.

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Figure 9

Variation of pump head with flow rate for different impeller designs. The data are taken by closing a valve at the outlet of the pump for three constant impeller speeds. The curves show predicted pump head variations determined using the techniques described by Zaher (13).

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Figure 10

Variation of pump head with flowrate for different impeller designs at impeller rotational speed of 3300rpm. Lines give theoretical values determined using Eqs. 5,7,8,9.

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Figure 11

Variation of pump head as the outlet valve is closed. φ=100% throttling means that the valve is completely closed and φ=0% throttling means that the valve is open.

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Figure 12

Hydraulic efficiency as dependent upon the impeller speed. The outlet valve is completely open and therefore the throttling is constant.

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Figure 13

Hydraulic efficiency data as dependent on flow rate. The flow is throttled at the outlet while each impeller is maintained for a constant impeller rotational speed of 3300rpm. Also, one data set for the hooked blades impeller is shown in which swirl components are included.

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Figure 14

Variation of normalized pump head with nondimensional flow rate comparing impeller designs tested in this study, two millimeter-scale pump designs (5), one typical macroscale pump (8), and a blood pump using an impeller with similar dimensions (2). The speed of the pumps tested in this study is 3300rpm, the miniature pump speed is 10,710rpm, the macroscale pump speed is 800rpm, and the blood pump speed is 3500rpm.

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