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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Experimental Examination of Unsteady Friction Models for Transient Pipe Flow Simulation

[+] Author and Article Information
Adam Adamkowski, Mariusz Lewandowski

Department of Hydraulic Machinery Tests and Diagnostics, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Gdansk, Poland

A conduit may be considered as a long conduit when proportion between its length L and internal diameter D is greater than 10.

Based on the comparison between many recorded courses of the quick closing valve closure, repeatability of these courses was affirmed so that repeatability of the manner of flow cut-off was also affirmed.

For recording traces of closing the valve the potentiometer was used.

Recu value in the turbulent case is about 30,000. It means that in this case (with initial conditions of Reo=15,800) calculations have to be carried out using the weighting function in 9.

It was assumed that the pipeline at the test rig is anchored against longitudinal movement.

The value of Icm depends on the number of wave periods taken into account.

The values of I for quasi-steady model are greater then for the Zielke model because of much lesser damping effect of pressure wave oscillations which cause that areas enclosed in pressure lines are bigger.

J. Fluids Eng 128(6), 1351-1363 (Mar 18, 2006) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2354521 History: Received April 06, 2005; Revised March 18, 2006

The paper presents a comparative analysis of calculations performed basing on the selected unsteady friction models and their validation based on the results of own experimental tests. The computer code developed for predicting transient pipe flows includes the models of: Zielke, Trikha, Vardy and Brown, Zarzycki, and Brunone Our own experiments have been conducted at a test rig designed and constructed at the Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IMP PAN) in Gdansk in order to test transient pipe flows in a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The results following from this analysis enable the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the models under consideration.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Diamond grid of characteristics with notation used in the calculation method

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Figure 2

Rectangular grid of characteristics with notation used in the calculation method

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Figure 3

Layout of the test rig

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Figure 4

Pressure changes measured in four pipe cross-sections—case of sudden flow cut-off with initial flow velocity Vo=0.94m∕s

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Figure 5

Run with Reo≅1100—comparison between calculated and measured pressure traces at the valve

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Figure 6

Run with Reo≅5700—comparison between calculated and measured pressure traces at the valve

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Figure 7

Run with Reo≅10,600—comparison between calculated and measured pressure traces at the valve

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Figure 8

Run with Reo≅15800—comparison between calculated and measured pressure traces at the valve

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Figure 9

Relation between the rate of pressure traces convergence and initial Reynolds number; Ic−m=f(Reo)

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