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TECHNICAL PAPERS

On the Mechanisms Affecting Fluidic Vectoring Using Suction

[+] Author and Article Information
R. D. Gillgrist1

Mechanical Engineering Department,  University of Minnesota, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455

D. J. Forliti2

Mechanical Engineering Department,  University of Minnesota, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455

P. J. Strykowski

Mechanical Engineering Department,  University of Minnesota, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455

1

Present address: Pastor, Wit’s End Church, 925 N. 130th Street, Seattle, WA 98133.

2

Present address: Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260.

J. Fluids Eng 129(1), 91-99 (Jun 02, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2375125 History: Received November 15, 2005; Revised June 02, 2006

Suction was applied asymmetrically to the exhaust of a rectangular subsonic jet creating a pressure field capable of vectoring the primary flow at angles up to 15deg. The suction simultaneously creates low pressures near the jet exhaust and conditions capable of drawing a secondary flow along the jet shear layer in the direction opposite to the primary jet. This countercurrent shear layer is affected both by the magnitude of the suction source as well as the proximity of an adjacent surface onto which the pressure forces act to achieve vectoring. This confined countercurrent flow gives rise to elevated turbulence levels in the jet shear layer as well as considerable increases in the gradients of the turbulent stresses. The turbulent stresses are responsible for producing a pressure field conducive for vectoring the jet at considerably reduced levels of secondary mass flow than would be possible in their absence.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Nozzle-collar configuration illustrating jet response when vacuum is applied asymmetrically to the jet exhaust

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Figure 2

Normalized gap pressure and secondary mass flow requirement as a function of primary jet turning angle

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Figure 3

Instantaneous velocity-vector fields in the upper shear layer of the jet taken for the unvectored baseflow

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Figure 4

Time-averaged velocity fields and streamlines for the unvectored baseflow. Dashed lines in (b) appear where the streamline does not represent the actual flow field

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Figure 5

Instantaneous velocity-vector fields in the upper shear layer of the jet taken for moderate vectoring; Δpgap∕ρjUj2=−0.057

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Figure 6

(a) Time-averaged velocity field and (b) streamlines for moderate flow vectoring; Δpgap∕ρjUj2=−0.057

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Figure 7

(a) Instantaneous velocity-vector fields and (b) mean velocity field for the highly vectored primary jet; Δpgap∕ρjUj2=−0.12

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Figure 8

Collar static pressure distribution and theoretical pressures computed assuming isentropic acceleration along the secondary flow path; moderate flow vectoring

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Figure 9

Collar static pressure distribution and theoretical pressures computed assuming isentropic acceleration along the secondary flow path; highly vectored flow

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Figure 10

Distributions of Reynolds stress for (a) unvectored and (b) highly vectored flow conditions

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Figure 11

Reynolds stress profiles taken at x∕H=1 for the baseline and highly vectored flow conditions

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