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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Thermodynamic Effect on a Cavitating Inducer in Liquid Nitrogen

[+] Author and Article Information
Yoshiki Yoshida

 Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 1 Koganezawa, Kimigaya, Kakuda, Miyagi 981-1525, Japankryoshi@kakuda.jaxa.jp

Kengo Kikuta

Research Student in JAXA Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577, Japan

Satoshi Hasegawa, Mitsuru Shimagaki

 Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 1 Koganezawa, Kimigaya, Kakuda, Miyagi 981-1525, Japan

Takashi Tokumasu

 Tohoku University, Institute of Fluid Science, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577, Japan

J. Fluids Eng 129(3), 273-278 (Oct 26, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2427076 History: Received June 23, 2005; Revised October 26, 2006

For experimental investigations of the thermodynamic effect on a cavitating inducer, it is nesessary to observe the cavitation. However, visualizations of the cavitation are not so easy in cryogenic flow. For this reason, we estimated the cavity region in liquid nitrogen based on measurements of the pressure fluctuation near the blade tip. In the present study, we focused on the length of the tip cavitation as a cavitation indicator. Comparison of the tip cavity length in liquid nitrogen (80K) with that in cold water (296K) allowed us to estimate the strength of the thermodynamic effect. The degree of thermodynamic effect was found to increase with an increase of the cavity length. The temperature depression was estimated from the difference of the cavitation number of corresponding cavity condition (i.e., cavity length) between in liquid nitrogen and in cold water. The estimated temperature depression caused by vaporization increased rapidly when the cavity length extended over the throat. In addition, the estimated temperature inside the bubble nearly reached the temperature of the triple point when the pump performance deteriorated.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Water cavitation tunnel

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Figure 2

Cryogenic inducer test facility

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Figure 3

Schematic diagram of the test inducer in liquid nitrogen showing the location of pressure taps

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Figure 4

Location of pressure taps along the blade

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Figure 5

Waterfall of unsteady pressure waveform at Pos. 4 (uncertainty in σ=0.001)

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Figure 6

Comparison of the cavitation performance between in cold water and that in liquid nitrogen (uncertainty in σ=0.001,ψ∕ψo=0.01)

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Figure 7

Visualization of the cavitation in cold water (uncertainty in σ=0.001)

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Figure 8

Unsteady pressure distribution in liquid nitrogen showing the cavity region (uncertainty in σ=0.001)

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Figure 9

Comparison of the cavity length of the tip cavitation between in cold water and that in liquid nitrogen (uncertainty in σ=0.001,Ccl=0.03)

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Figure 10

Estimated temperature depression, and B-factor as a function of the cavity length

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Figure 11

Variation of the thermodynamic function Σ(T) of nitrogen and oxygen

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