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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Experimental Study on Flow-Induced Disk Flutter Dynamics by Measuring the Pressure Between Disks

[+] Author and Article Information
Shigenori Takada1

Graduate School of Engineering, Kansai University, 887-2 Yoshino, Maizuru, Kyoto 625-0003, Japanelp_110@yahoo.co.jp

Norio Tagawa

High Technology Research Center (HRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680, Japantagawa@ipcku.kansai-u.ac.jp

Atsunobu Mori

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680, Japanmoriatsu@ipcku.kansai-u.ac.jp

Yoshiaki Mizoh, Masaru Nakakita

 Panasonic Shikoku Electronics Co., Ltd., 2131-1, Minamigata, Toon, Ehime 791-0395, Japan

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 129(3), 368-375 (Jul 26, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2427086 History: Received March 22, 2006; Revised July 26, 2006

It is important to clarify the characteristics of flow-induced vibrations in hard disk drives in order to achieve an ultrahigh magnetic recording density. In particular, it is necessary to reduce the flow-induced disk vibrations referred to as disk flutter. This paper describes the correlation between the disk vibration amplitude and the pressure fluctuation between a pair of high-speed corotating disks. It also reveals the effects of the arm thickness and arm shape on the disk vibrations and the static pressure between the disks. The disk vibrations were measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The static pressure downstream of the arm between a pair of narrow disks was measured by a method in which a side-hole needle was used as a measurement probe. In addition, the direction of air flow along the trailing edge of the arm was measured using a hot-wire anemometer. The experimental results revealed that the arm inserted between the disks suppresses the disk vibrations. However, the shape and thickness of the arm did not quantitatively affect the disk vibrations. The root-mean-square (RMS) static pressure fluctuation downstream of the arm decreased remarkably, whereas the mean static pressure increased when the arm was inserted between the disks. Furthermore, the circumferential variations in both the RMS and mean static pressures reduced when the arm was inserted. Therefore, it is suggested that the disk vibrations are excited by an increase in the static pressure fluctuation, mean dynamic pressure, and circumferential variation in the static pressure between the disks. Consequently, the disk vibrations can be suppressed by inserting the arm or a spoiler.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Pressure , Vibration , Disks
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of flow field between disks

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Figure 2

Schematic of HDD model

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Figure 3

Sectional view of HDD model

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Figure 4

Schematic of arm inserted between disks

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Figure 5

Schematic of experimental setup for measuring disk vibrations and pressure distribution

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Figure 6

Schematic of method for measuring static pressure between two disks using pressure sensor

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Figure 7

Static pressure in wind tunnel (calculated versus experimental results)

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Figure 8

Schematic of static pressure measurement points downstream of the arm

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Figure 9

Static pressure downstream of the arm between disks (calculated versus experimental results)

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Figure 10

Experimental results of disk vibration at disk rim

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Figure 11

FFT results of static pressure fluctuation downstream of the arm between disks

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Figure 12

Schematic of static pressure measurement region downstream of arm

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Figure 13

RMS static pressure fluctuation downstream of the arm

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Figure 14

Mean static pressure distribution downstream region of the arm

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Figure 15

Airflow direction downstream of the arm between disks

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