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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Oxygen Separation/Enrichment From Atmospheric Air Using Magnetizing Force

[+] Author and Article Information
Yutaka Asako

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japanasako@ecomp.metro-u.ac.jp

Yohei Suzuki

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan

J. Fluids Eng 129(4), 438-445 (Oct 03, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2436584 History: Received April 13, 2006; Revised October 03, 2006

Oxygen is a paramagnetic gas and it has relatively high magnetic susceptibility. On the contrary, nitrogen is a diamagnetic gas and it has relatively low and negative magnetic susceptibility. This results in countermagnetizing forces acting on these gases. The characteristics of oxygen separation/enrichment from atmospheric air in a capsule and air flow in a parallel-plate duct using a magnetizing force were investigated numerically. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was utilized to obtain distribution of oxygen concentration of air under a strong magnetic field gradient. The molecular movement was calculated by taking into account the magnetizing forces on the molecules. The computations were performed for a wide range of pressure and magnetic flux density gradient. Quantitative characteristics of oxygen separation/enrichment from atmospheric air under a strong magnetic field gradient and a parameter which governs this phenomenon are obtained from the simulation results.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Magnetizing force under magnetic field

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Figure 2

Flow chart of direct simulation Monte Carlo

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Figure 3

Cell size effect on mole fraction of O2

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Figure 4

Schematic diagrams of problems: (a) capsule; and (b) parallel-plate duct

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Figure 5

Contour plots for No. 2: (a) mole fraction; (b) temperature; and (c) pressure

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Figure 6

Contour plots for ∇⃗B2=108T2∕m: (a) mole fraction; and (b) pressure

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Figure 7

Contour plots of mole fraction of O2: (a) No. 1 (∇⃗B2=1010T2∕m); (b) No. 2 (∇⃗B2=1011T2∕m); and (c) No. 3 (∇⃗B2=1012T2∕m)

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Figure 8

Effect of ∇⃗B2 on mole fraction of O2: (a) capsule; and (b) parallel-plate duct

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Figure 9

Effect of pressure on mole fraction of O2: (a) capsule; and (b) parallel-plate duct

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Figure 10

Effect of h on mole fraction of O2: (a) capsule; and (b) parallel-plate duct

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Figure 11

Effect of ∇⃗B2∕(pKn) on mole fraction of O2: (a) capsule; and (b) parallel-plate duct

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Figure 12

Contour plots of mole fraction of O2: (a) No. 16 (l∕h=4); and (b) No. 17 (l∕h=10)

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Figure 13

Contour plot of mole fraction of O2: (a) No. 18 (∇⃗B2=108T2∕m); and (b) No. 19 (∇⃗B2=107T2∕m)

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