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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Automatic Differentiation of the General-Purpose Computational Fluid Dynamics Package FLUENT

[+] Author and Article Information
Christian H. Bischof, Arno Rasch, Emil Slusanschi

Institute for Scientific Computing, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen, Germany

H. Martin Bücker

Institute for Scientific Computing, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen, Germanybuecker@sc.rwth-aachen.de

Bruno Lang

 Bergische Universität Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal, Germany

FLUENT is a registered trademark of Fluent Inc.

J. Fluids Eng 129(5), 652-658 (Oct 12, 2006) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2720475 History: Received May 12, 2005; Revised October 12, 2006

Derivatives are a crucial ingredient to a broad variety of computational techniques in science and engineering. While numerical approaches for evaluating derivatives suffer from truncation error, automatic differentiation is accurate up to machine precision. The term automatic differentiation comprises a set of techniques for mechanically transforming a given computer program to another one capable of evaluating derivatives. A common misconception about automatic differentiation is that this technique only works on local pieces of fairly simple code. Here, it is shown that automatic differentiation is not only applicable to small academic codes, but scales to advanced industrial software packages. In particular, the general-purpose computational fluid dynamics software package FLUENT is transformed by automatic differentiation.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

Streamtraces in the vicinity of the step

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Figure 4

Scaled derivatives, H∕u∞∙∣∂u∕∂H∣, over the complete domain (bottom) and a detailed view of the vicinity of the step (top)

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Figure 8

Spinning bowl. Each row corresponds to one time step, showing the velocity (left), the volume fraction (middle), and the derivative of the velocity with respect to the turbulence parameter C1ε (right)

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Figure 7

Schematic picture of the bowl and the grid

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Figure 6

Scaled derivative of the pressure, H∕p∞∙∂p∕∂H, over the complete domain

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Figure 5

Static pressure of the fluid, p∕p∞, over the complete domain

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Figure 2

Scaled velocity of the fluid, ∣u∣∕u∞, over the complete domain (bottom) and a detailed view of the vicinity of the step (top)

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Figure 1

Schematic picture of the backward-facing step and the grid

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