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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Modeling of Effect of Inflow Turbulence Data on Large Eddy Simulation of Circular Cylinder Flows

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Tutar1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mersin University, Çiftlikköy, 33343, Mersin, Turkeym_tutar@mersin.edu.tr

I. Celik, I. Yavuz

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 129(6), 780-790 (Nov 03, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2734225 History: Received June 16, 2006; Revised November 03, 2006

A random flow generation (RFG) algorithm for a previously established large eddy simulation (LES) code is successfully incorporated into a finite element fluid flow solver to generate the required inflow/initial turbulence boundary conditions for the three-dimensional (3D) LES computations of viscous incompressible turbulent flow over a nominally two-dimensional (2D) circular cylinder at Reynolds number of 140,000. The effect of generated turbulent inflow boundary conditions on the near wake flow and the shear layer and on the prediction of integral flow parameters is studied based on long time average results. Because the near-wall region cannot be resolved for high Reynolds number flows, no-slip velocity boundary function is used, but wall effects are taken into consideration with a near-wall modeling methodology that comprises the no-slip function with a modified form of van Driest damping approach to reduce the subgrid length scale in the vicinity of the cylinder wall. Simulations are performed for a 2D and a 3D configuration, and the simulation results are compared to each other and to the experimental data for different turbulent inflow boundary conditions with varying degree of inflow turbulence to assess the functionality of the RFG algorithm for the present LES code and, hence, its influence on the vortex shedding mechanism and the resulting flow field predictions.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The geometric configuration of the flow domain and the corresponding velocity boundary conditions. The fluctuating velocity components (ũ,ν̃,w̃) at the inflow boundary are computed by the RFG algorithm and are superimposed on the time-averaged velocity values.

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Figure 2

A computational mesh used for the present LES calculations. The mesh contains 435×300×32 grid points: (a) Global 3D mesh view, (b) 2D local mesh view around the cylinder in the x-y plane, and (c) 2D mesh view in the x-z plane.

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Figure 3

The instantaneous velocity vectors obtained from 2D and 3D LES computations at two different spanwise locations at a nondimensional time of t*=105.2 at inflow turbulence level of 0.6%: (a) Case 2, (b) case 4, 2D view in the x-y plane at z∕D=0.8D, (c) case 4, 2D view in the x-y plane at z∕D=3.5D

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Figure 4

The instantaneous vorticity contours obtained from 2D and 3D LES at a nondimensional time of t*=47.6 at inflow turbulence level of 0.6%: (a) Case 2, (b) case 4, 2D view in the x-y plane at z∕D=0.8D, (c) case 4, 2D view in the x-z plane at y∕D=0

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Figure 5

The time-averaged streamwise velocity distributions in the near wake along a constant x∕D=1 position for different mesh systems (cases 1–4) and that of experimental data of Cantwell and Coles (24)

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Figure 6

Pressure distributions in terms of time-averaged pressure coefficient C¯P over the cylinder surface for different mesh systems (cases 1–4) and that of experimental data of Cantwell and Coles (24)

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Figure 7

Time history of nondimensional x and y velocity components for the 3D LES computations at two different points P(0, 7D, 2D) and (0, 7.5D, 2.25D) at the inflow boundary for different turbulence inflow boundary conditions generated by the RFG algorithm: (a) Case 4 at Iu=0.6% and (b) case 5 at Iu=6%

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Figure 8

One-dimensional energy spectrums for the y velocity component obtained from the 3D LES computations at the inflow boundary and at two more selected locations along the centerline of the cylinder for different turbulent inflow data: (a)P(0,7D, 2D), (b) very near to the front stagnation point of the cylinder P(0,6.985D, 2D), and (c)P(8.5D,7D,2D), −5∕3 slope

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Figure 9

Pressure distributions in terms of time-averaged pressure coefficient C¯P over the cylinder surface for different turbulent inflow boundary conditions for the 3D LES computations

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Figure 10

Instantaneous vorticity contours at the midspanwise plane of z∕D=2 in the near wake of the cylinder for the 3D LES computations at a nondimensional time of t*=43.6: (a) Case 6, smooth inflow; (b) case 4; Iu=0.6%, and (c) case 5, Iu=6%

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Figure 11

Instantaneous velocity vectors at the mid-transverse plane of y∕D=0 in the wake of the cylinder for the 3D LES computations at different inflow turbulence levels t*=43.6; (a) Case 6, smooth inflow; (b) case 4, Iu=0.6%, and (c) case 5; Iu=6%

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