0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

Representing Polydispersed Droplet Behavior in Nucleating Steam Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
A. G. Gerber, A. Mousavi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B5A3 Canada

J. Fluids Eng 129(11), 1404-1414 (May 31, 2007) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2786536 History: Received September 15, 2006; Revised May 31, 2007

The quadrature method of moments (QMOM) is applied to the particle size distribution (PSD) present in nucleating steam flow, with a particular emphasis on conditions relevant to low-pressure steam turbines. These machines exhibit heterogeneous and homogeneous phase transition in the presence of strong flow discontinuities due to shocks and complex geometry. They offer a particularly difficult two-phase modeling situation. The present work shows that QMOM is a robust and efficient method and, in comparison to current practice of using a monodispersed PSD in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, offers promise for dealing with the complex two-phase conditions present in real machines.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Topology of phase transition in a LP steam turbine: a-a, saturation line; b-b, heterogeneous nucleation transition; c-c, primary homogeneous nucleation transition; d-d, secondary primary homogeneous nucleation transition; e-e, secondary droplet region originating from trailing edges of rotating blades. Stator and rotor components labeled with S and R, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) Comparison of calculated pressure distribution to experiment for nozzles A–D (p0in=25kPa, (T0in)A,B,C,D=354.6K, 357.6K, 358.6K, 361.8K); (b) comparison of calculated mean droplet radius to measured values at a specified location

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Comparison of calculated pressure distribution (with p0in=25kPa, inlet dhet=1.25μm and Nhet=5×1012kg−1) to nozzle E experiments, which include droplets generated heterogeneously in the system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) QMOM results for normalized pressure, wetness, and nucleation, with Nhet=108kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm. ((b),(c),(d), and (e)) Droplet size and weight distribution at locations (1), (2), (3), and (4) (nozzle A conditions).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Centerline value of mean droplet radius, skewness, and standard deviation, with Nhet=108kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm (nozzle A)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

(a) QMOM results for normalized pressure, wetness, and nucleation, where Nhet=1016kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm. ((b), (c), (d), and (e)) Droplet size and weight distribution at locations (1), (2), (3), and (4) (nozzle A conditions).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Centerline value of mean droplet radius, skewness, and standard deviation, where Nhet=1016kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm (nozzle A)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

(a) QMOM results for normalized pressure, wetness and nucleation, where Nhet=108kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm. ((b), (c), (d), and (e)) Droplet size and weight distribution at locations (1), (2), (3), and (4), back pressure Pout=18kPa (nozzle B conditions).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Centerline value of mean droplet radius, skewness, and standard deviation, where Nhet=108kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm (nozzle B)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

(a) QMOM results for normalized pressure, wetness, and nucleation, where Nhet=1016kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm. ((b), (c), (d), and (e)) Droplet size and weight distribution at locations (1), (2), (3) and (4), back pressure Pout=18kPa (nozzle B conditions).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Centerline value of mean droplet radius, skewness, and standard deviation, where Nhet=1016kg−1 and Rhet=0.1μm

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In