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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Kinematic and Dynamic Parameters of a Liquid-Solid Pipe Flow Using DPIV∕Accelerometry

[+] Author and Article Information
Joseph Borowsky

School of Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854borowsky@eden.rutgers.edu

Timothy Wei

Jonsson Engineering Center, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180

J. Fluids Eng 129(11), 1415-1421 (Jun 13, 2007) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2786537 History: Received October 23, 2006; Revised June 13, 2007

An experimental investigation of a two-phase pipe flow was undertaken to study kinematic and dynamic parameters of the fluid and solid phases. To accomplish this, a two-color digital particle image velocimetry and accelerometry (DPIV∕DPIA) methodology was used to measure velocity and acceleration fields of the fluid phase and solid phase simultaneously. The simultaneous, two-color DPIV∕DPIA measurements provided information on the changing characteristics of two-phase flow kinematic and dynamic quantities. Analysis of kinematic terms indicated that turbulence was suppressed due to the presence of the solid phase. Dynamic considerations focused on the second and third central moments of temporal acceleration for both phases. For the condition studied, the distribution across the tube of the second central moment of acceleration indicated a higher value for the solid phase than the fluid phase; both phases had increased values near the wall. The third central moment statistic of acceleration showed a variation between the two phases with the fluid phase having an oscillatory-type profile across the tube and the solid phase having a fairly flat profile. The differences in second and third central moment profiles between the two phases are attributed to the inertia of each particle type and its response to turbulence structures. Analysis of acceleration statistics provides another approach to characterize flow fields and gives some insight into the flow structures, even for steady flows.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of apparatus including optics and cameras

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Figure 2

(Top) Normalized mean axial velocity distribution across the tube diameter. Uncertainty bars due to particle displacement resolution are small relative to the size of the data symbol. (Bottom) Mean axial velocity distribution normalized with inner variables (U∕u* and y+=yu*∕ν) and plotted with the Clauser profile and White profile.

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Figure 3

Normalized mean axial velocity distribution of two-phase flow across the tube diameter

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Figure 4

Comparison of single-phase and two-phase mean axial velocity distributions of the fluid phase across the tube diameter

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Figure 5

Comparison of normalized axial (u′rms) and radial (v′rms) turbulence intensities of the fluid phase for single-phase flow and two-phase flow. Data points include from the wall to the tube centerline.

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Figure 6

Comparison of the normalized axial turbulence intensity distribution of the fluid phase with Righetti and Romano (3). Data points include from the wall to the tube centerline.

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Figure 7

Comparison of the normalized radial turbulence intensity distribution of the fluid phase with Righetti and Romano (3). Data points include from the wall to the tube centerline.

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Figure 8

Histogram of axial acceleration at r∕D=0.09. Fluid phase (top) and solid phase (middle) and overlapping distributions of both phases (bottom).

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Figure 9

Histogram of axial acceleration at r∕D=0.4. Fluid phase (top) and solid phase (middle) and overlapping distributions of both phases (bottom).

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Figure 10

Profiles of the second central moment of the fluid phase and solid phase axial acceleration probability distributions. Estimated uncertainty bars are small relative to the size of the data symbol.

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Figure 11

Profiles of the third central moment of the fluid phase and solid phase axial acceleration probability distributions

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