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RESEARCH PAPERS

Large-Eddy Simulation of Shock-Wave-Induced Turbulent Mixing

[+] Author and Article Information
Ben Thornber

Fluid Mechanics and Computational Science Group, Aerospace Sciences Department, School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, UKb.j.r.thornber@cranfield.ac.uk

Dimitris Drikakis

Fluid Mechanics and Computational Science Group, Aerospace Sciences Department, School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, UKd.drikakis@cranfield.ac.uk

J. Fluids Eng 129(12), 1504-1513 (Jun 29, 2007) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2801367 History: Received February 07, 2007; Revised June 29, 2007

The paper presents implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) simulation of a shock tube experiment involving compressible turbulent mixing. A new characteristic-based approximate Riemann solver is derived, and employed in a second-order and fifth-order finite volume Godunov-type ILES framework. The methods are validated against (qualitative) experimental data and then compared and contrasted in terms of resolved turbulent kinetic energy and mixing parameters as a function of grid resolution. It is concluded that both schemes represent the experiment with good accuracy. However, the fifth-order results are approximately equivalent to results gained on double the grid size at second order, whereas the fifth-order method requires only approximately 20% extra computational time.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the half-height experiment; note that the shock tube is 100mm deep

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Figure 2

Comparison of experimental images (left, © British Crown Copyright 2006/MOD) and SF6 density (kg∕m3) for fifth order (center) and second order (right) using the grid of cross section of 600×160×320

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Figure 4

Comparison of experimental shock and SF6 positions (dashed line) and numerical results (solid line) for second order (left) and fifth order (right) using the grid of cross section of 160×320

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Figure 6

Comparison of ⟨f1⟩⟨f2⟩ at 4ms

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Figure 7

Comparison of ⟨f1f2⟩ at 4ms

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Figure 8

Comparison of turbulent kinetic energy per meter at 4ms

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Figure 9

Comparison of total resolved turbulent kinetic energy variation with time, where time is measured from the passage of the shock through the first interface

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Figure 5

Isosurfaces of 1%, 50%, and 99% volume fraction of air

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Figure 3

Line average SF6 density at 4ms

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