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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Modeling the Blow-Blow Forming Process in Glass Container Manufacturing: A Comparison Between Computations and Experiments

[+] Author and Article Information
C. G. Giannopapa

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlandsc.g.giannopapa@tue.nl

J. A. W. M. Groot

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlandsj.a.w.m.groot@tue.nl

J. Fluids Eng 133(2), 021103 (Feb 24, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003559 History: Received November 08, 2009; Revised January 30, 2011; Published February 24, 2011; Online February 24, 2011

The blow-blow forming process is a widely used technique in glass container manufacturing (e.g., production of glass bottles and jars). This process typically takes few seconds and is characterized by large deformations and temperature gradients. In the work of Giannopapa (2008, “Development of a Computer Simulation Model for Blowing Glass Containers,” ASME J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., 130, p. 041003), the development of a computer simulation model for glass blowing was presented and demonstrated on dummy problems with an initially uniform glass temperature. The objective of this paper is to extend and further develop the simulation model to be used for industrial purposes. To achieve this, both steps of the blow-blow forming process of glass containers are simulated and tested against real industrial problems. In this paper, a nonuniform temperature distribution is considered for the blowing of the preform, which is reconstructed from temperature data provided by the industry. The model is validated by means of several examples regarding conservation properties, behavior of the flow, and comparison of the glass thickness with experimental measurements. Furthermore, by means of these examples, the sensitivity of the glass thickness to inaccuracies in the measurement and reconstruction of the initial temperature distribution is verified.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic drawing of a blow-blow process

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Figure 2

Curve fit of the glass viscosity data by the VFT equation

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Figure 3

Finite element mesh and interface representation: (a) preform and (b) bottle

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Figure 4

Temperature distribution of preform

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Figure 5

The glass area propagation of the first blow step of the preform. Air is denoted with blue and glass with red (in online version).

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Figure 6

Temperature profiles of the first blow step of the preform at different times

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Figure 7

The glass area propagation of the second blow step of the bottle with stretch time 0.3 s. Air is denoted with blue and glass with red (in online version).

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Figure 8

Temperature profiles of the second blow step of the bottle at different times

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Figure 9

Final product thickness distribution

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Figure 10

Final product thickness distribution for the simulation

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Figure 11

Volume conservation of the consecutive first and second blow stages using the Euler Implicit time discretization scheme with time steps 1e–4

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