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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Wave Propagation in Thin-Walled Aortic Analogues

[+] Author and Article Information
C. G. Giannopapa

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlandsc.g.giannopapa@tue.nl

J. M. B. Kroot, A. S. Tijsseling

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands

M. C. M. Rutten, F. N. van de Vosse

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands

J. Fluids Eng 132(2), 021104 (Feb 04, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000792 History: Received June 23, 2008; Revised December 07, 2009; Published February 04, 2010; Online February 04, 2010

Research on wave propagation in liquid filled vessels is often motivated by the need to understand arterial blood flows. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the propagation of waves in flexible tubes has been studied by many researchers. The analytical one-dimensional frequency domain wave theory has a great advantage of providing accurate results without the additional computational cost related to the modern time domain simulation models. For assessing the validity of analytical and numerical models, well defined in vitro experiments are of great importance. The objective of this paper is to present a frequency domain analytical model based on the one-dimensional wave propagation theory and validate it against experimental data obtained for aortic analogs. The elastic and viscoelastic properties of the wall are included in the analytical model. The pressure, volumetric flow rate, and wall distention obtained from the analytical model are compared with experimental data in two straight tubes with aortic relevance. The analytical results and the experimental measurements were found to be in good agreement when the viscoelastic properties of the wall are taken into account.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 4

Relaxation test (3% elongation)

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Figure 3

Polyurethane vessels

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Figure 2

Schematic of axial positions of a tube with closed ends, used in the 1D model

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Figure 1

Tube motion variables. Point P(z,r) on the surface of the wall at rest displaces to position P′(z+ζ,r+ξ).

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Figure 5

Experimental setup

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Figure 6

Vessel A. Solid line experimental data, dashed line analytical solution for elastic wall. (a) pressure (Pa), (b) flow rate (m3/s), and (c) wall distention (μm).

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Figure 7

Vessel A. Solid line experimental data, dashed line analytical solution for viscoelastic wall. (a) pressure (Pa), (b) flow rate (m3/s), and (c) wall distention (μm).

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Figure 8

Vessel B. Solid line experimental data, dashed line analytical solution for viscoelastic wall. (a) Pressure (Pa), (b) Flow rate (m3/s), and (c) wall distention (μm).

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