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Research Papers: Multiphase Flows

Thermodynamic Effect on a Cavitating Inducer—Part II: On-Board Measurements of Temperature Depression Within Leading Edge Cavities

[+] Author and Article Information
Jean-Pierre Franc

LEGI, Grenoble Institute of Technology, Université Joseph Fourier, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9, Francejean-pierre.franc@inpg.fr

Guillaume Boitel, Michel Riondet

LEGI, Grenoble Institute of Technology, Université Joseph Fourier, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9, France

Éric Janson, Pierre Ramina, Claude Rebattet

 CREMHYG, Grenoble Institute of Technology, BP 95, 38402 Saint-Martin d'Hères Cedex, France

The heat supplied by the vapor is usually negligible.

J. Fluids Eng 132(2), 021304 (Feb 17, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001007 History: Received September 29, 2008; Revised December 14, 2009; Published February 17, 2010; Online February 17, 2010

Temperature depression within the leading edge cavities on a space inducer is measured in Refrigerant 114 using miniature thermocouples mounted on the rotating blades. Time-averaged values of cavity temperature depression are determined all along the descent in cavitation number and correlated with the extent of cavities. In addition to mean values, temperature fluctuations are analyzed with respect to the onset of cavitation instabilities, namely, alternate blade cavitation and supersynchronous rotating cavitation. Temperature spectra relative to a rotating frame of reference are compared with pressure spectra obtained in a fixed frame of reference. Temperature oscillations issued from different blades are compared, and phase shifts between consecutive and opposite blades are evaluated in the case of the supersynchronous instability regime.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 15

Evolution of temperature oscillations near the desinence of rotating cavitation

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Figure 16

Spectra of the signals presented in Fig. 1. Spectra have been smoothed and normalized so that the area under the spectra is unity.

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Figure 14

Phase shift between blades 2, 3, and 4 as a function of the cavitation number under supersynchronous rotating cavitation. The dotted lines correspond to rough values, whereas the bold lines correspond to values corrected of the difference in angular location of temperature sensors.

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Figure 13

Computed correlation coefficients versus phase difference for temperature signals measured on different blades

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Figure 12

Comparison of temperature spectra on blades 2, 3, and 4 under supersynchronous rotating cavitation (same operating conditions as Fig. 1)

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Figure 11

Comparison of temperature fluctuations on blades 2, 3, and 4 under supersynchronous rotating cavitation (R114 20°C)

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Figure 10

Comparison between temperature and pressure spectra under alternate blade cavitation and supersynchronous rotating cavitation. For condition (a), cavity closes in the vicinity of temperature sensor 6 and downstream for conditions (b), (c), and (d). Same operating conditions as Fig. 8 (R114 20°C).

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Figure 9

Comparison of signals of sensors 5 and 6 (blade 3) and 3 (blade 1) under supersynchronous rotating cavitation (R114 20°C)

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Figure 8

Evolution of rms value of temperature fluctuations during a cavitation test (R114 20°C) and comparison with cavitation instabilities (alternate blade cavitation and supersynchronous rotating cavitation)

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Figure 7

Typical spectra of pressure fluctuations on the four-bladed tested inducer in water showing the two main cavitation instabilities, namely, alternate blade cavitation and supersynchronous rotating cavitation. Spectra have been obtained from a pressure transducer mounted on the casing in the neighborhood of the leading edges.

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Figure 6

Evolution of cavity temperature depression during a cavitation test at the downstream station. Comparison with upstream station (R114 30°C).

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Figure 5

Evolution of cavity temperature depression during a cavitation test at the most upstream station (sensors 4, 5, and 7) and correlation with cavity visualizations. The white arrow indicates location of sensor 5 (R114 30°C).

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Figure 4

Typical evolution of temperatures at the end of a cavitation test during pressure rise (R114 30°C)

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Figure 3

View of one curved and two straight thermocouples on blade 3

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Figure 2

Location of temperature sensors on the inducer. Sensors 3, 5, and 7 are straight whereas sensors 2, 4, and 6 are curved. Sensor 3 is on blade 1, sensor 4 is on blade 2, sensors 5, 6, and 7 are on blade 3, and sensor 2 is on blade 4.

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Figure 1

B factor versus void fraction

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