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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Application of Nonlinear Turbulence Models for Marine Propulsors

[+] Author and Article Information
Prachakon Kaewkhiaw

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, International Maritime College, Kasetsart University, Si Racha Campus, 199 ToongSukhla, Si Racha, Chonburi 20230, Thailandprachakon_k@yahoo.co.th

Yodchai Tiaple

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, International Maritime College, Kasetsart University, Si Racha Campus, 199 ToongSukhla, Si Racha, Chonburi 20230, Thailandyodchai_tp@hotmail.com

Pramote Dechaumphai

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailandfmepdc@eng.chula.ac.th

Varangrat Juntasaro1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkhen, Bangkok 10900, Thailandfengvrj@ku.ac.th

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 133(3), 031101 (Mar 10, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003564 History: Received June 23, 2010; Revised February 02, 2011; Published March 10, 2011; Online March 10, 2011

The realistic simulation of cavitation on a marine propeller is important for the efficient design of the propeller. However, the flow characteristic that occurred on the marine propeller is complicated and difficult to predict due to the combined effects of turbulence, cavitation, and multiphase phenomena. There is still currently no turbulence model that can predict these combined effects satisfactory. The nonlinear turbulence model is therefore modified and applied to predict the cavitation on a marine propeller for the first time in this work. It is found that the nonlinear turbulence model can predict the cavitation and hence the thrust and torque coefficients much more accurately than the existing Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes turbulence models including the Reynolds-stress model.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Grid divisions for the propeller at advance ratio J=0.5 and cavitation number σ=3

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Figure 2

Computational domain of the propeller

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Figure 3

Thrust coefficient (Kt), torque coefficient (Kq), and efficiency (ηo) versus advance ratio (J) for the noncavitation cases

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Figure 4

Thrust coefficient (Kt) versus cavitation number (σ) at advance ratio J=0.5 using linear turbulence models

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Figure 5

Torque coefficient (Kq) versus cavitation number (σ) at advance ratio J=0.5 using linear turbulence models

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Figure 6

Thrust coefficient (Kt) versus cavitation number (σ) at advance ratio J=0.5 using the modified nonlinear turbulence model

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Figure 7

Torque coefficient (Kq) versus cavitation number (σ) at advance ratio J=0.5 using the modified nonlinear turbulence model

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Figure 8

Pressure coefficient contour at σ=3 and J=0.5

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Figure 9

Vapor volume fraction contour at σ=3 and J=0.5

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Figure 10

(a) Comparison of the cavity shape on the propeller between the computation and the experiment at σ=3 and J=0.5: computation (left-hand); sketch from the experiment (right-hand). (b) Comparison of the cavity shape on the propeller between the computation and the experiment at σ=3.5 and J=0.7: computation (left-hand); sketch from the experiment (right-hand).

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