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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Flow Characteristics of Microglass Fiber Suspension in Polymeric Fluids in Spherical Gaps

[+] Author and Article Information
Hiroshi Yamaguchi, Xiao-Dong Niu, Yuta Ito

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energy Conversion Research Center, Doshisha University, Kyoto 630-0321, Japan

Xin-Rong Zhang1

Department of Energy and Resources Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, 100871, P.R. China; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energy Conversion Research Center, Doshisha University, Kyoto 630-0321, Japanscho@mail.doshisha.ac.jp

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 132(5), 051205 (May 13, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001491 History: Received June 27, 2009; Revised March 17, 2010; Published May 13, 2010; Online May 13, 2010

An experimental study is carried out to investigate the effects of microglass fiber suspensions in the non-Newtonian fluids in a gap between an inner rotating sphere and an outer whole stationary sphere. In the experiments, the microglass fibers with different aspect ratios are mixed with a macromolecule polymeric fluid to obtain different suspension fluids. For comparison, a Newtonian fluid and the non-Newtonian polymeric fluid are also studied. The stationary torques of the inner sphere that the test fluids acted on are measured under conditions of various concentric spherical gaps and rotational Reynolds numbers. It is found that the polymeric fluid could be governed by the Couette flow at a gap ratio of less than 0.42 and the Reynolds number of less than 100, while the fiber-suspended polymeric fluids could expand the Couette flow region more than the Reynolds number of 100 at the same gap ratios.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A schematic diagram of the apparatus used in the experiments

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Figure 2

Visualization of the glass fiber

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Figure 3

The rheological characteristics of the test fluids: (a) shear viscosity for the test fluids; (b) the first normal stress difference for the test fluids

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Figure 4

The spherical coordinate system

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Figure 5

Torque coefficients versus Reynolds numbers for glycerin70% with rotating inner sphere

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Figure 6

Torque coefficients versus Reynolds numbers for PAA2000 with rotating inner sphere

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Figure 7

Torque coefficients versus Reynolds numbers for glass fiber-suspended polymeric fluids for α=0.08 with rotating inner sphere

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Figure 8

Torque coefficients versus Reynolds numbers for glass fiber-suspended polymeric fluids for α=0.42 with rotating inner sphere

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Figure 9

Torque coefficients versus Reynolds numbers for glass fiber-suspended polymeric fluids for α=1.00 with rotating inner sphere

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Figure 10

Torque coefficients versus Reynolds numbers for glass fiber-suspended polymeric fluids for α=1.37 with rotating inner sphere

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Figure 11

Sketch of evolutions of the T–G vortex: (a) four symmetric vortices; (b) Taylor–Görtler vortex; and (c) spiral Taylor–Görtler vortex

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Figure 12

Flow visualizations of the test fluids in two gap ratios: (a) static flow at the gap ratio α=0.42; (b) quasi-static flow at the gap ratio α=1.00

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