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RESEARCH PAPERS: Suspensions and Soret Effect

Computational Simulation on Performance Enhancement of Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Processes With Electrostatic Assist

[+] Author and Article Information
Hidemasa Takana1

Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8577, Japantakana@paris.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

Kazuhiro Ogawa

Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-1, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japankogawa@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp

Tetsuo Shoji

Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-1, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japantshoji@rift.mech.ac.jp

Hideya Nishiyama

Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8577, Japannishiyama@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 130(8), 081701 (Jul 30, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2907417 History: Received March 05, 2007; Revised December 25, 2007; Published July 30, 2008

A real-time computational simulation on the entire cold spray process is carried out by the integrated model of compressible flow field, splat formation model, and coating formation model, in order to provide the fundamental data for the advanced high performance cold gas dynamic spray process with electrostatic acceleration. In this computation, viscous drag force, flow acceleration added mass, gravity, Basset history force, Saffman lift force, Brownian motion, thermophoresis, and electrostatic force are all considered in the particle equation of motion for the more realistic prediction of in-flight nano∕microparticle characteristics with electrostatic force and also for the detailed analysis of particle-shock-wave-substrate interaction. Computational results show that electrostatic acceleration can broaden the smallest size of applicable particle diameter for successful adhesion; as a result, wider coating can be realized. The utilization of electrostatic acceleration enhances the performance of cold dynamic spray process even under the presence of unavoidable shock wave.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Axial flow velocity distributions in r‐z plane

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Figure 9

Effect of electrostatic acceleration on coating characteristics

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Figure 10

Comparison with experimental result for the relative velocity of particles at the exit of a supersonic nozzle

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Figure 2

Effect of particle size on flight trajectory without electrostatic acceleration

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Figure 3

Effect of electrostatic acceleration on the particle impact velocities for various particle diameters

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Figure 4

Dependence of electrostatic field intensity and particle diameter on particle acceleration: (a) vpin=5m∕s and (b) 30m∕s

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Figure 5

Axial evolutions of particle velocities for different particle diameters of 900nm, 4μm, and 12μm

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Figure 6

Contribution ratios of each force acting on a particle without electrostatic acceleration

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Figure 7

Contribution ratios of each force acting on a particle with electrostatic acceleration

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Figure 8

Particle impact velocities and particle impact positions on the substrate with or without electrostatic acceleration

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