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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Viscous Disk Air Flow Displacement Device (VDAFDD): Development and Performance

[+] Author and Article Information
Jonathan M. Hilton

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, 50 South Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Phillip M. Ligrani1

Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Parks College of Engineering, Aviation, and Technology, Saint Louis University, 3450 Lindell Boulevard, McDonnell Douglas Hall Room 1033A, St. Louis, MO 63103pligrani@slu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 132(10), 101102 (Oct 20, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002522 History: Received May 16, 2009; Revised August 03, 2010; Published October 20, 2010; Online October 20, 2010

The development and performance of a unique viscous disk air flow displacement device (or VDAFDD) for inducing airflow in confined spaces is described. The development is motivated by electronic cooling, where limitations on space are especially severe and the need exists to circulate air over or through the key components using a compact and efficient device. To induce air motion, array of disks are employed with their axis of rotation perpendicular to the air stream. Results from the most successful prototype, which was developed and tested, prototype 2, are presented for Reynolds numbers up to 671 to illustrate nominal behavior, as well as behavior as a number of different parameters are altered, including the magnitude of exit flow restriction, the air gap above the disks, and the number of disks employed to induce air motion. Also discussed are the effects of disk rotational speed, comparisons with theoretical predictions, and one earlier prototype whose performance is significantly less than that of prototype 2.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

VDAFDD prototype 2

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Figure 2

Overall layout of flow region of the VDAFDD prototype 2 showing the disk region and the Couette flow region

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Figure 3

(a) Coordinate system for the disk region, (b) coordinate system for the Couette flow region, and (c) 3D view of VDAFDD prototype 2

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Figure 4

(a) Flow path for the VDAFDD prototype 2, (b) damper position d of VDAFDD prototype 2, and (c) VDAFDD prototype 2 rotor with 25 disk array and with 15 disk array with obstruction blocks to limit flow to 15 disks

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Figure 5

VDAFDD prototype 1

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Figure 6

Schematic of the test setup for the VDAFDD

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Figure 7

Variation of streamwise velocity with r and z using Eq. 4 and ΔP=1.7 Pa

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Figure 8

Comparison of measured and theoretical volumetric flow rates for ΔP=1.25–9.21 Pa where Eqs. 6,10 are used to determine theoretical values

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Figure 9

Measured and theoretical pressure rise as dependent upon volumetric flow rate for different disk rotational speeds where Eqs. 6,10 are used to determine theoretical values

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Figure 10

Pressure rise as dependent upon exit duct flow restriction for different disk rotational speeds

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Figure 11

Pressure rise as dependent upon disk rotational speed for different exit duct flow restriction magnitudes

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Figure 12

Volumetric flow rate as dependent upon exit duct flow restriction for different disk rotational speeds

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Figure 13

Power consumption as dependent upon exit duct flow restriction for different disk rotational speeds

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Figure 14

Pressure rise as dependent upon exit duct flow restriction for different disk rotational speeds for air gap heights of 1.0 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.25 mm

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Figure 15

Pressure rise as dependent upon disk rotational speed for exit duct flow restriction magnitudes for air gap heights of 1.0 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.25 mm

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Figure 16

Volumetric flow rate as dependent upon exit duct flow restriction for different disk rotational speeds for air gap heights of 1.0 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.25 mm

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Figure 17

Pressure rise as dependent upon volumetric flow rate for different disk rotational speeds for air gap heights of 1.0 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.25 mm

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Figure 18

Pressure rise as dependent upon exit duct flow restriction for 15 and 25 disk arrays for different disk rotational speeds

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Figure 19

Pressure rise as dependent upon disk rotational speed for 15 and 25 disk arrays for different exit duct flow restriction magnitudes

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Figure 20

Volumetric flow rate as dependent upon exit duct flow restriction for 15 and 25 disk arrays for different disk rotational speeds

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Figure 21

Pressure rise as dependent upon volumetric flow rate for 15 and 25 disk arrays for different disk rotational speeds

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