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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Forces and Surface Pressure on a Blade Moving in Front of the Admission Region

[+] Author and Article Information
Soo-Yong Cho

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (ReCAPT), Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwadong, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701, Republic of Koreasycho@gnu.kr

Chong-Hyun Cho

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (ReCAPT), Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwadong, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701, Republic of Korea

Kook-Young Ahn

Department of Eco-Machinery, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343, Republic of Koreakyahn@kimm.re.kr

Young-Cheol Kim

Department of Eco-Machinery, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343, Republic of Korea

J. Fluids Eng 132(12), 121101 (Dec 03, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002468 History: Received April 09, 2010; Revised August 16, 2010; Published December 03, 2010; Online December 03, 2010

The partial admission technique is widely used to control the output power of turbines. In some cases, it has more merits than full admission. However, additional losses, such as expansion, mixing, or pumping, are generated in partial admission as compared with full admission. Thus, an experiment was conducted in a linear cascade apparatus having a partial admission region in order to investigate the effect of partial admission on a blade row. The admission region was formed by a spouting nozzle installed at the inlet of the linear cascade apparatus. Its cross section was rectangular and its size is 200×200mm2. The tested blade was axial-type and its chord was 200 mm. Nineteen identical blades were applied to the linear cascade for the partial admission experiment. The blades moved along the rotational direction in front of the admission region, and then operating forces and surface pressures on the blades were measured at the steady state. The experiment was conducted at a Reynolds number of 3×105 based on the chord. The nozzle flow angle was set to 65 deg with a solidity of 1.38 for performance test at the design point. In addition, another two different solidities of 1.25 and 1.67 were applied. From the experimental results, when the solidity was decreased, the maximum rotational force increased but the maximum axial force decreased.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 9

Rotational forces on a blade along the rotational direction

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Figure 10

Axial forces on a blade along the rotational direction

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Figure 11

Static pressure coefficient at the suction surface (S1) and the pressure surface (P8)

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Figure 12

Shape of static pressure coefficient on the blade at ς=−0.01 (upper) and ς=2.49 (lower)

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Figure 13

Variation of static pressure coefficient at the leaving region

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Figure 14

Variation of rotational forces with different solidities

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Figure 15

Comparison of rotational forces based on the end of admission region

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Figure 16

Nondimensionalized rotational forces with different solidities

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Figure 17

Variation of axial forces with different solidities

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Figure 18

Comparison of axial forces at the end of the admission region

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Figure 19

Static pressure coefficient along the rotational direction with different solidities: (a) σ=1.67 (b) σ=1.25

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Figure 20

Comparison of static pressure coefficients at the (a) entering and (b) leaving locations

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Figure 1

Linear cascades in front of the partial admission region

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Figure 2

Pressure taps on a tested turbine blade

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Figure 3

Blade for measuring forces with a two-axis load cell

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Figure 4

Load cell outputs by the rotational and axial forces

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Figure 8

Variation of static pressure coefficient along the suction and pressure surfaces

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Figure 5

Coordinates at the linear cascade experimental apparatus

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Figure 6

Variation of static pressure coefficient at different spanwise locations with σ=1.38: (a) hub, (b) mean, and (c) tip

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Figure 7

Variation of static pressure coefficient on the suction (S4) and pressure surfaces (P4)

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