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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Numerical Simulation of the Transient Flow in a Centrifugal Pump During Starting Period

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhifeng Li

Institute of Process Equipment, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, P. R. Chinaandycas@zju.edu.cn

Dazhuan Wu1

Institute of Process Equipment, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, P. R. Chinawudazhuan@zju.edu.cn

Leqin Wang

Institute of Process Equipment, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, P. R. Chinahj_wlq2@zju.edu.cn

Bin Huang

Institute of Process Equipment, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, P. R. Chinahuangbin4862@sina.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 132(8), 081102 (Aug 16, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002056 History: Received November 29, 2009; Revised June 20, 2010; Published August 16, 2010; Online August 16, 2010

Computational fluid dynamics were used to study the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible viscous flows in a centrifugal pump during rapid starting period (≈0.12 s). The rotational speed variation of the field around the impeller was realized by a dynamic slip region method, which combines the dynamic mesh method with nonconformal grid boundaries. In order to avoid introducing errors brought by the externally specified unsteady inlet and outlet boundary conditions, a physical model composed of a pipe system and pump was developed for numerical self-coupling computation. The proposed method makes the computation processes more close to the real conditions. Relations between the instantaneous flow evolutions and the corresponding transient flow-rate, head, efficiency and power were analyzed. Relative velocity comparisons between the transient and the corresponding quasisteady results were discussed. Observations of the formations and evolutions of the primary vortices filled between the startup blades illustrate the features of the transient internal flow. The computational transient performances qualitatively agree with published data, indicating that the present method is capable of solving unsteady flow in a centrifugal pump under transient operations.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 12

Instantaneous relative velocity evolutions in the impeller inlet (reference frame is fixed on the impeller, 0.02 s≤t≤0.1 s): (a) t=0.02 s, (b) t=0.04 s, (c) t=0.06 s, (d) t=0.08 s, and (e) t=0.1 s

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Figure 1

3D description of the DSR method

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Figure 2

Schematic view of the volute’s eight cross sections, circumferential 45 deg between each

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Figure 3

Numerical model of circuit system

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Figure 4

Detail of the pump mesh

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Figure 5

Transient flow-rates at inlet and outlet sections

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Figure 6

Numerical steady Q-H curve for the cycling system model (n=2950 rpm)

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Figure 7

Comparison between calculated and experimental (1) results

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Figure 8

Instantaneous numerical static relative pressure at inlet and outlet sections during startup

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Figure 9

Total head coefficients comparison between the startup and quasisteady hypothesis

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Figure 10

Transient impeller power and hydraulic efficiency during the startup period

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Figure 11

Comparisons between transient (left) and quasi-steady (right) relative velocity evolutions (reference frame is fixed on the impeller, 0.02 s≤t≤0.2 s): (a) t=0.02 s (transient, t∗=0.06 s), (b) t=0.02 s (quasisteady), (c) t=0.04 s (transient, t∗=0.08 s), (d) t=0.04 s (quasisteady), (e) t=0.06 s (transient, t∗=0.1 s), (f) t=0.06 s (quasisteady), (g) t=0.08 s (transient, t∗=0.12 s), (h) t=0.08 s (quasisteady), (i) t=0.1 s (transient, t∗=0.14 s), (j) t=0.1 s (quasisteady), (k) t=0.12 s (transient, t∗=0.16 s), (l) t=0.12 s (quasisteady), (m) t=0.2 s (transient, t∗=0.24 s), and (n) t=0.2 s (quasisteady)

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