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Research Papers: Techniques and Procedures

A Methodology to Measure Aerodynamic Forces on Cylinders in Channel Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Alan A. Thrift

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16803aat142@psu.edu

Scott J. Brumbaugh

Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16803sjb206@psu.edu

Karen A. Thole

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16803kthole@psu.edu

Atul Kohli

 Pratt & Whitney, 400 Main Street, M/S 165-16, East Hartford, CT 06108atul.kohli@pw.utc.com

J. Fluids Eng 132(8), 081401 (Aug 26, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002198 History: Received June 05, 2009; Revised July 15, 2010; Published August 26, 2010; Online August 26, 2010

While the measurement of drag and lift forces on a body in external flow is common practice, the same cannot be said for aerodynamic forces on bodies in internal flows. The inherent difficulty in making force measurements on a body in an internal channel flow is decoupling the body from the bounding walls. The methodology presented in this paper uses a technique to overcome this constraint to accurately measure two components of force on a single cylinder within a single row array, with an aspect ratio (height-to-diameter ratio) of 1. Experiments were conducted with air over a range of Reynolds numbers between 7500 and 35,000 and for three different spanwise pin spacings. Experimental results indicated an increase in cylinder drag with a reduction in spanwise pin spacing. The gas turbine and electronics industries use cylinders or pin fins in internal flow channels to increase heat transfer augmentation through high turbulence and increased surface area. The flow fields in these obstructed channels are difficult to predict, so these measurements can be used to directly compare with predicted drag and lift forces.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

(a) Side and (b) overhead schematics of the test section where all drag force measurements were made

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Figure 3

Plot of the empty channel friction factor results

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Figure 4

Schematic of the DSC-6 force sensor

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Figure 12

Dimensioned schematic of pertinent geometric information for the sensor cylinder clearance hole

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Figure 13

Plot of the cross axis corrected voltages from the DSC-6 sensor output, specifically a Re=24,000 flow for a single row of cylinders with an S/d=2

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Figure 14

Plot of drag coefficients for all three row spacings compared with an infinite cylinder drag coefficient as a function of Reynolds number

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Figure 15

Plot of drag coefficients for all three row spacings compared with the pressure drag integrated from Ames (2) as a function of Reynolds number

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Figure 1

Schematic of the overall test facility used for all drag force testing

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Figure 5

Electrical schematic of a half, type II Wheatstone bridge where the tension and compression resistor are internal to the DSC-6 force sensor and all other components are internal to the signal conditioning equipment

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Figure 6

Plot of sensor output from a typical calibration test of both sensor axes

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Figure 7

Plot demonstrating the cross axis sensitivity of four different sensor axes

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Figure 8

Plot demonstrating effect of the cross axis correction on the constant of proportionality for two sensor axes

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Figure 9

Summary of the relative error between the x-axis sensor output and the applied calibration force

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Figure 10

Summary of the relative error between the y-axis sensor output and the applied calibration force

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Figure 11

The scatter plot summarizes the results of a one-axis DSC-6 force sensor calibration test with a variety of excitation voltages

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