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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

A Study of Cycle-to-Cycle Variations and the Influence of Charge Motion Control on In-Cylinder Flow in an IC Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Mayank Mittal

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824mittalma@msu.edu

Harold J. Schock

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824schock@egr.msu.edu

J. Fluids Eng 132(5), 051107 (May 13, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001617 History: Received February 23, 2009; Revised April 11, 2010; Published May 13, 2010; Online May 13, 2010

An experimental study is performed to investigate the cycle-to-cycle variations and the influence of charge motion control on in-cylinder flow measurement inside an internal combustion engine assembly. Molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) is used to obtain the multiple point measurement of the instantaneous velocity field. MTV is a molecular counterpart of particle-based techniques, and it eliminates the use of seed particles. A two-component velocity field is obtained at various crank angle degrees for tumble and swirl measurement planes inside an optical engine assembly (1500 rpm and 2500 rpm engine speeds). Effects of charge motion control are studied considering different cases of: (i) charge motion control valve (CMCV) deactivated and (ii) CMCV activated. Both the measurement planes are used in each case to study the cycle-to-cycle variability inside an engine cylinder. Probability density functions of the normalized circulation are calculated from the instantaneous planar velocity to quantify the cycle-to-cycle variations of in-cylinder flows. In addition, the turbulent kinetic energy of flow is calculated and compared with the results of the probability density function. Different geometries of CMCV produce different effects on the in-cylinder flow field. It is found that the charge motion control used in this study has a profound effect on cycle-to-cycle variations during the intake and early compression; however, its influence reduces during the late compression. Therefore, it can be assumed that CMCV enhances the fuel-air mixing more than the flame speed.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Tumble and swirl measurement planes inside an IC engine cylinder

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Figure 2

Schematic of MTV optical setup for in-cylinder flow measurement

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Figure 3

Undelayed (left) and delayed (right) images for tumble measurement plane at 138 CAD

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Figure 4

Ensemble-averaged velocity vectors for activated CMCV at 121 CAD considering (a) 1–100, (b) 101–200, and (c) 1–500 consecutive undelayed frames; swirl measurement plane at 1500 rpm

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Figure 5

Ensemble-averaged velocity vectors, contours of velocity rms for deactivated (left) and activated (right) CMCV at (a) 121 and (b) 300 CADs; swirl measurement plane at 1500 rpm

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Figure 6

PDFs of normalized circulation at different crank angle degrees; swirl measurement plane at 1500 rpm

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Figure 7

Turbulent kinetic energy at different crank angle degrees; swirl measurement plane at 1500 rpm

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Figure 8

Ensemble-averaged velocity vectors, contours of velocity rms for deactivated (left) and activated (right) CMCV at (a) 171 and (b) 221 CADs; swirl measurement plane at 2500 rpm

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Figure 9

PDFs of normalized circulation at different crank angle degrees; swirl measurement plane at 2500 rpm

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Figure 10

STDEV of NC and turbulent kinetic energy at different crank angle degrees; swirl measurement plane at 2500 rpm

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Figure 11

PDFs of normalized circulation at different crank angle degrees; tumble measurement plane at 1500 rpm

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Figure 12

STDEV of NC and turbulent kinetic energy at different crank angle degrees; tumble measurement plane at 1500 rpm

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Figure 13

PDFs of normalized circulation at different crank angle degrees; tumble measurement plane at 2500 rpm

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Figure 14

STDEV of NC and turbulent kinetic energy at different crank angle degrees; tumble measurement plane at 2500 rpm

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