0
Technical Briefs

Mass Transfer Coefficients for a Non-Newtonian Fluid and Water With and Without Antifoam Agents

[+] Author and Article Information
Robert A. Leishear

 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29803robert.leishear@srnl.doe.gov

Hector N. Guerrero

 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29803hector.guerrero@srs.gov

Michael L. Restivo

 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29803michael.restivo@srnl.doe.gov

David J. Sherwood

 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, 2435 Stevents Center Place, Richland, WA 99354

J. Fluids Eng 132(11), 114501 (Nov 03, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002704 History: Received October 14, 2008; Revised October 02, 2009; Published November 03, 2010; Online November 03, 2010

Mass transfer rates were measured in a large scale system, which is consisted of an 8.4 m tall by 0.76 m diameter column, containing one of the three fluids: water with an antifoam agent, water without an antifoam agent, and AZ101 simulant, which simulated a non-Newtonian nuclear waste. The testing contributed to the evaluation of large scale mass transfer of hydrogen in nuclear waste tanks. Due to its radioactivity, the waste was chemically simulated and due to flammability concerns, oxygen was used in lieu of hydrogen. Different liquids were used to better understand the mass transfer processes, where each of the fluids was saturated with oxygen, and the oxygen was then removed from the solution as air bubbled up or sparged through the solution from the bottom of the column. Air sparging was supplied by a single tube, which was co-axial to the column; the decrease in oxygen concentration was recorded, and oxygen measurements were then used to determine the mass transfer coefficients to describe the rate of oxygen transfer from solution. Superficial, average, sparging velocities of 2 mm/s, 5mm/s, and 10 mm/s were applied to each of the liquids at three different column fill levels, and mass transfer coefficient test results are presented here for combinations of superficial velocities and fluid levels.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Column installation for water and AZ101 testing

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Column details for water and AZ101 testing

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Equipment schematic

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Fluid properties

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Installed static mixer

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Formation of a cone of bubbles at the sparger in water, viewed at the bottom viewport

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Uniform distribution as the bubbles rise in water, viewed at a higher viewport

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Mass transfer coefficients for tests in water in 3.63 m depth

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Mass Transfer coefficients for tests in water for 7.41 m depth

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Mass transfer coefficients for tests in water, no AFA, for different depths

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Mass transfer coefficients for tests in water with AFA for different column depths

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Comparison of mass transfer coefficients in water and AZ101 fluid with AFA for 7.41 m depth

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Comparison of mass transfer coefficients in water and AZ101 fluid with AFA for 1.31 m depth

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 20

Comparison of predicted mass transfer coefficients to experiments for water without AFA

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 21

Comparison of predicted mass transfer coefficients to experiments for water with AFA

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 22

Comparison of predicted mass transfer coefficients to experiments for AZ101 fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Bubble formation in AZ101, viewed from the top of the column do equipment

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Typical DO measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Atypical DO measurements near the bottom of the column

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Typical mass transfer calculation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Atypical mass transfer calculation, near the column bottom

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Mass transfer coefficients for tests in water for 1.31 m depth

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In