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Research Papers: Multiphase Flows

Secondary-Drop-Breakup Simulation Integrated With Fuel-Breakup Simulation Near Injector Outlet

[+] Author and Article Information
Eiji Ishii

Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034, Japaneiji.ishii.qm@hitachi.com Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika, Hitachi, Ibaraki 319-1292, Japan e-mail: yoshihiro.sukegawa.ax@hitachi.comeiji.ishii.qm@hitachi.com Hitachi Automotive Systems, Ltd., 1671-1 Kasukawa, Isesaki, Gunma 372-0023, Japan e-mail: hiroshi.yamada.gm@hitachi.comeiji.ishii.qm@hitachi.com

Masanori Ishikawa

Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034, Japanmasanori.ishikawa.sf@hitachi.com Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika, Hitachi, Ibaraki 319-1292, Japan e-mail: yoshihiro.sukegawa.ax@hitachi.commasanori.ishikawa.sf@hitachi.com Hitachi Automotive Systems, Ltd., 1671-1 Kasukawa, Isesaki, Gunma 372-0023, Japan e-mail: hiroshi.yamada.gm@hitachi.commasanori.ishikawa.sf@hitachi.com

Yoshihiro Sukegawa, Hiroshi Yamada

Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034, Japan Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika, Hitachi, Ibaraki 319-1292, Japan e-mail: yoshihiro.sukegawa.ax@hitachi.com Hitachi Automotive Systems, Ltd., 1671-1 Kasukawa, Isesaki, Gunma 372-0023, Japan e-mail: hiroshi.yamada.gm@hitachi.com

J. Fluids Eng 133(8), 081302 (Aug 23, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004764 History: Received February 15, 2011; Revised June 13, 2011; Published August 23, 2011; Online August 23, 2011

The fuel spray of an injector for automobile engines contains multiscale free surfaces: liquid films formed at the fuel-injector outlet, ligaments generated by liquid-film breakup, and droplets generated from the ligaments within the secondary-drop-breakup region. To simulate these multiscale free surfaces, we developed a method that combines two types of simulation. The liquid-film breakup near the injector outlet was simulated by using a particle method, and the secondary-drop breakup after the liquid-film breakup was simulated by using a discrete droplet model (DDM). The injection conditions of DDM were the distributions of droplet diameters and velocities calculated in the liquid-film-breakup simulation. We applied our method to simulate the spray from a collision-type fuel injector. The simulated liquid-film breakup near the injector outlet and behavior of the secondary-drop breakup qualitatively agreed with measurements. Furthermore, the errors of the mean droplet diameters between the simulations and the measurements were less than 12%. This shows that our method is effective for fuel spray simulation.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Simulation model of fuel spray

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Figure 2

MPS and CIP procedures in modified hybrid method. Equations written in full were added to original procedures.

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Figure 3

Definition of distance from interface

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Figure 4

Calculation of velocity and diameter distributions of droplets in data-sampling region

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Figure 5

Computational model of collapse of water column

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Figure 6

Collapse of water column at 0.2 and 0.6 s: (a) measurement, (b) simulation with two-phase particle model, and (c) simulation with single-phase particle model

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Figure 7

Movement of leading edge during collapse of water column

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Figure 8

Simulation model for liquid-film breakup near nozzle outlets

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Figure 9

Computational grids for: (a) liquid-film-breakup simulation (182,020 cells) and (b) secondary-drop-breakup simulation (100 × 100 × 100 cells)

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Figure 10

Fuel spray simulation compared with measurements. Liquid-film breakup: (a) simulation and (b) measurements. Secondary-drop breakup: (c) simulation and (d) measurements.

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Figure 11

Effects of initial particle distance on mean diameter, D32 . L0 : standard distance of initial particle distance. (D32 )0 : mean diameter simulated by using L0 . H: data-sampling position below nozzle outlets.

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Figure 12

Predicted droplet diameters D32 compared with measured ones. Standard nozzle: shown in Table 1; nozzle A: 1.4-times larger diameter than that of standard nozzle; nozzle B: 1.4-times longer than standard nozzle.

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