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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Flow Transition Behavior of the Wetting Flow Between the Film Flow and Rivulet Flow on an Inclined Wall

[+] Author and Article Information
Yoshiyuki Iso1

IHI Corporation, Research Laboratory, 1, Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235-8501, Japan e-mail: yoshiyuki_iso@ihi.co.jp Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, 500 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791, Korea; School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China e-mail: xichen@columbia.edu

Xi Chen

IHI Corporation, Research Laboratory, 1, Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235-8501, Japan e-mail: yoshiyuki_iso@ihi.co.jp Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, 500 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791, Korea; School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China e-mail: xichen@columbia.edu

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IHI INC., Business Development Division, 150 East 52nd Street, 24th Floor, New York, NY 10022.

J. Fluids Eng 133(9), 091101 (Sep 12, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004765 History: Received October 31, 2010; Revised June 23, 2011; Published September 12, 2011; Online September 12, 2011

Gas-liquid two-phase interfacial flows, such as the liquid film flows (also known as wetting flows on walls), are observed in many industrial processes including absorption, desorption, distillation, and so on. The present study focuses on the characteristics of wetting flows, in particular the drastic transition between the film flow and rivulet flow, as the liquid flow rate and the wall surface texture treatments are varied. The three-dimensional gas-liquid two-phase interfacial flow (wetting flow) simulation is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) model. As the liquid flow rate is increased and then decreased, a hysteresis of the transition between the film flow and rivulet flow is discovered, which implies that the transition phenomenon depends primarily on the history of the change of interfacial surface shape (which affects the process of the flow pattern transition). The applicability and accuracy of the present numerical simulation is validated by using the existing experimental and theoretical studies. Further study on the effect of texture geometry shows that the surface texture treatments added on the wall can impede liquid channeling and increase the wetted area.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Computational region and a sample of grid for wetting flows

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Figure 2

Two images of typical flow features in the present case (birds-eye view)

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Figure 3

Wetted areas Aw/At on the smooth wall as a function of the Weber number Wel N

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Figure 4

Instantaneous liquid flow patterns visualized by interfacial surfaces between gas and liquid (results on the smooth wall while the liquid flow rate is increasing)

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Figure 5

Liquid film thickness δ on the smooth wall as a function of the Reynolds number Rel N (stable film flows are formed when Aw /At  = 1)

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Figure 6

Computational region and a sample grid for wetting flows with wall surface texture treatments

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Figure 7

Wetted areas Aw/At as a function of the Weber number Wel N (while the liquid flow rate is increasing)

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Figure 8

Instantaneous liquid flow patterns visualized by interfacial surfaces between gas and liquid (results on the wall surface texture while the liquid flow rate is increasing)

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