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Technical Briefs

Numerical Simulation of Polymer Injection in Turbulent Flow Past a Circular Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
David Richter

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering,  Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305drichter@stanford.edu

Eric S. G. Shaqfeh

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering,  Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305esgs@stanford.edu

Gianluca Iaccarino

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering,  Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305jops@stanford.edu

J. Fluids Eng 133(10), 104501 (Sep 27, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004960 History: Received June 01, 2011; Accepted August 24, 2011; Published September 27, 2011; Online September 27, 2011

Using a code developed to compute high Reynolds number viscoelastic flows, polymer injection from the upstream stagnation point of a circular cylinder is modeled at Re=3900. Polymer stresses are represented using the FENE-P constitutive equations. By increasing polymer injection rates within realistic ranges, significant near wake stabilization is observed. Rather than a turbulent detached shear layer giving way to a chaotic primary vortex (as seen in Newtonian flows at high Re), a much more coherent primary vortex is shed, which possesses an increased core pressure as well as a reduced level of turbulent energy.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of injector, showing region of prescribed normal injector velocity uinj and constant normalized concentration φ=1

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Figure 2

Schematic of the computational domain

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Figure 3

Surfaces of instantaneous vorticity ωz=±9.0 for: (a) Newtonian flow; (b) injection velocity uinj=0.1 (Q=0.0853); (c) injection velocity uinj=0.3 (Q=0.256). Injection cases are viscoelastic with Wi=10, L=50, and β0=0.1.

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Figure 4

Energy spectra E¯22 taken within the shear layer. Viscoelastic computations are at β0=0.1, Wi=10, and L=50. Homogeneous simulation at Wi=10, L=50, and β=0.9. Frequency normalized with Strouhal frequency.

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Figure 5

Energy spectra E¯11 measured at y/D=0, x/D=7.0. Viscoelastic computations are at β0=0.1, Wi=10, and L=50. Homogeneous simulation at Wi=10, L=50, and β=0.9. Frequency normalized with Strouhal frequency.

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Figure 6

Contours of spanwise-averaged reference pressure p¯ at an instant in time for the cases of: (a) Water injection at uinj=0.3; (b) Polymer injection at uinj=0.1, Wi=10, L=50, β0=0.1; and (c) Polymer injection at uinj=0.3, Wi=10, L=50, β0=0.1. Scale is the same for all three figures with 10 contours between -0.6<p¯<0.4. Dark colors are for low pressure. Light colors are for high pressure.

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