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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Numerical Simulation of the Transient Flow in a Radial Flow Pump during Stopping Period

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Liu

Institute of Chemical Process Machinery, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Engineering Research Center of High Pressure Process Equipment and Safety, Ministry of Education,  Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, P. R. Chinaliujintao86@hotmail.com

Z. Li1

Institute of Chemical Process Machinery, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Engineering Research Center of High Pressure Process Equipment and Safety, Ministry of Education,  Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, P. R. Chinaandycas@zju.edu.cn

L. Wang, L. Jiao

Institute of Chemical Process Machinery, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Engineering Research Center of High Pressure Process Equipment and Safety, Ministry of Education,  Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, P. R. China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 133(11), 111101 (Oct 24, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005137 History: Received January 24, 2011; Revised September 15, 2011; Published October 24, 2011; Online October 24, 2011

Three-dimensional (3-D) unsteady incompressible and non-cavitating flow in a radial flow pump during the rapid stopping period was numerically studied by CFD. The dynamic mesh (DM) method combined with non-conformal grid boundaries was applied to simulate the transient stopping process. In order to exclude the uncertainty of the unsteady inlet and outlet boundaries, a loop pumping system was established, which was composed of pipes, a reservoir with an air part on the top, and a driving pump. Simulations were performed based on the standard k-ɛ turbulence model and volume of fluid (VOF) model. Results showed that the air part in the reservoir approximated real conditions when using the VOF model. Pressure fluctuations were reduced and a sharp increase of pressure at the inlet of the pump was observed at the beginning of the stopping period. Specific transient characteristics, such as the flow-rate, head and efficiency, were analyzed during the deceleration period and compared with corresponding quasi-steady results. The deviation of the quasi-steady hypothesis in predicting the transient stopping process of radial flow pumps is thought to be caused by differences in the predicted vortex in the impeller. The transient curve showing the relationship between the instantaneous flow coefficient and total pressure rise coefficient was analyzed and compared with the quasi-steady curve. The two curves had a crossover point when the stall just occurs in the impeller during the transient process. Simulation results were also compared and validated using published data.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic view of the physical model

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Figure 2

Mesh of pump model

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Figure 3

Relationship between performance of pump and Rr

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Figure 4

External characteristics of transient process

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Figure 5

Derivatives of external characteristics

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Figure 6

The pressure at the inlet of pump

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Figure 7

Head and flow relationships of quasi-steady and unsteady results

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Figure 8

The relationship between instantaneous flow coefficient and total pressure rise coefficient

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Figure 9

Comparisons of relative velocities between the transient and quasi-steady assumption

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